Jump to content


Photo

Book club


  • Please log in to reply
160 replies to this topic

#41 Amanda

Amanda
  • Moderator
  • 7,626 posts
  • Location:NE Portland
  • Interests:Eating, cooking, kayaking, canoeing, letterboxing

Posted 15 May 2006 - 06:46 AM

Are we still on for tonight??? I'll be catching the bus over. Rachel, Angelhair, VJ, and whoever, if anyone, else who is coming...tell me what you'd like me to bring!

Best regards,

Amanda

#42 MaBell

MaBell
  • Members
  • 1,089 posts
  • Location:SE Portland

Posted 15 May 2006 - 07:02 AM

Are we still on for tonight??? I'll be catching the bus over. Rachel, Angelhair, VJ, and whoever, if anyone, else who is coming...tell me what you'd like me to bring!

Best regards,

Amanda


Hi Amanda -

Yes, we're still on and aiming for 5:30. I'll PM you with the other details (directions, etc.).

Thanks!

Rachel
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#43 Angelhair

Angelhair
  • Moderator
  • 7,660 posts
  • Location:downtown
  • Interests:film, cooking, literature

Posted 15 May 2006 - 07:22 AM

Amanda, are you coming from work? I can give you a lift.

#44 Amanda

Amanda
  • Moderator
  • 7,626 posts
  • Location:NE Portland
  • Interests:Eating, cooking, kayaking, canoeing, letterboxing

Posted 15 May 2006 - 10:37 AM

Thanks for the offer, Nikki!

I've got some running around to do and I don't know how long that will take or where I'll be when so I will probably just catch the bus over there from wherever I end up. Either that or go home and get my car and do my errands that way. It all depends. But I do appreciate your asking.

Looking forward to seeing you this evening!

Best regards,

Amanda

#45 vj

vj
  • Moderator
  • 2,747 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Albina (NE Pdx)

Posted 15 May 2006 - 01:46 PM

Just for whatever's sake, here's what I'm bringing - small quantities of:
- Viande house pate
- St Andre cheese (aka book club cheese)
- Ken's artisan baguette

and I still haven't finished the book. Should I bring my own drinks as well? Or pick up something at Woodstock W&D on the way?

#46 Angelhair

Angelhair
  • Moderator
  • 7,660 posts
  • Location:downtown
  • Interests:film, cooking, literature

Posted 15 May 2006 - 02:10 PM

I'll bring beer.

#47 MaBell

MaBell
  • Members
  • 1,089 posts
  • Location:SE Portland

Posted 15 May 2006 - 03:27 PM

I'll have asparagus wrapped in prosciutto w/ truffle butter and rice crackers topped w/ wasabi cream cheese and shrimp. I was going to make stuffed figs but I refuse to put the oven on on a day like today. There's also an olive oil cake with strawberries. I have white and red wine and various types of non-alcoholic stuff here too.
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#48 LaTauladelBonMenjar

LaTauladelBonMenjar
  • Members
  • 511 posts
  • Location:SE PDX
  • Interests:Humankind's attempts at creating beauty in our day-to-day lives, including food and drink, decorative and fine arts, fashion, architecture and design, graciousness, generosity and humor.

Posted 15 May 2006 - 04:57 PM

I'm still at work in the 'Couv and haven't finished the book, but I will be more on top of things next month and join in.

#49 Amanda

Amanda
  • Moderator
  • 7,626 posts
  • Location:NE Portland
  • Interests:Eating, cooking, kayaking, canoeing, letterboxing

Posted 16 May 2006 - 06:01 AM

WOW! Thanks for the grand time last night at Book Club!!! I ate everything in site and loved it ALL! That asparagus was incredible! Thanks so much to Ma Bell and Pat for opening up their lovely home to us. It was great to see Rachel, Pat, Nikki and VJ. It's been ages since I saw VJ so I was especially looking forward to it! She's been zigging while I've been zagging, I guess!

It looks like there is a lot of non-fiction books out there to read about food. I'm so glad you all are so knowledgeable. I'm looking forward to reading next whatever is most highly recommended!

Thanks again for a delightful evening!!! Perhaps I will get to host next time!

Best regards,

Amanda

#50 MaBell

MaBell
  • Members
  • 1,089 posts
  • Location:SE Portland

Posted 16 May 2006 - 06:11 AM

I forgot to serve you guys the olive oil cake! Oh well, I'll have to make another one for next month. In the meantime I'm now stuck in a house with a cake which is a dangerous thing for me.

Thanks everyone for a great first book club gathering. I'm looking forward to diving into the next title.

Work is going to pretty hectic for the next few days but I'll put together a list of some suggested titles (with links so you can read a bit about each title) for next month as soon as I have a chance.

---Rachel
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#51 Angelhair

Angelhair
  • Moderator
  • 7,660 posts
  • Location:downtown
  • Interests:film, cooking, literature

Posted 16 May 2006 - 06:17 AM

I had a great time too. It's easy to get off topic when the book that we read was about a food critic. It was a lively discussion.

Now onto the next title! Lots of suggestions were bandied about last night. Including MFK Fisher's The Gastronical Me. Let's all throw out a few ideas and then as a group decide what's next.

Thanks again for a lovely time Rachel and Pat.

Niki

#52 Angelhair

Angelhair
  • Moderator
  • 7,660 posts
  • Location:downtown
  • Interests:film, cooking, literature

Posted 16 May 2006 - 07:26 AM

Even though it's off-topic, let me add that we tasted several IPAs last night, among them was Rogue's Imperial IPA. I have a half case of this leftover from at least a year ago. Wow, this is a remarkable beer. It's refreshing, but substantial. It's super-hoppy, but it has an initial cistrussy taste that mellows it out.

Rogue has a garage sale on memorial day weekend. If this is on sale, I am buying another case of it.

#53 LaTauladelBonMenjar

LaTauladelBonMenjar
  • Members
  • 511 posts
  • Location:SE PDX
  • Interests:Humankind's attempts at creating beauty in our day-to-day lives, including food and drink, decorative and fine arts, fashion, architecture and design, graciousness, generosity and humor.

Posted 16 May 2006 - 08:12 AM

I'm in for the next one!

#54 MaBell

MaBell
  • Members
  • 1,089 posts
  • Location:SE Portland

Posted 16 May 2006 - 08:34 AM

I asked Extra MSG to move this topic to "events" - it seemed more appropriate than in the "other" section.

Thanks,

Rachel
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#55 vj

vj
  • Moderator
  • 2,747 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Albina (NE Pdx)

Posted 16 May 2006 - 08:42 AM

Thanks for a very nice evening, Rachel. I loved hanging out with yous guys and chatting food, food reviewing, etc, oh, and eating Rachel's food--yum!

#56 MaBell

MaBell
  • Members
  • 1,089 posts
  • Location:SE Portland

Posted 16 May 2006 - 06:43 PM

Even though it's off-topic, let me add that we tasted several IPAs last night, among them was Rogue's Imperial IPA. I have a half case of this leftover from at least a year ago. Wow, this is a remarkable beer. It's refreshing, but substantial. It's super-hoppy, but it has an initial cistrussy taste that mellows it out.

Rogue has a garage sale on memorial day weekend. If this is on sale, I am buying another case of it.


That Rogue Imperial Pale Ale was delightful. I'll definitely be stocking up if the price is right.
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#57 wordstern

wordstern
  • Members
  • 76 posts
  • Location:Portland
  • Interests:writing, cooking, walking around portland, piano, movies, getting in trouble, singing standards, talking to myself

Posted 17 May 2006 - 01:47 PM

Damn- I'm only seeing this thread now. Count me potentially in for the next round

#58 MaBell

MaBell
  • Members
  • 1,089 posts
  • Location:SE Portland

Posted 19 May 2006 - 03:02 PM

Hi guys -

I put together a short list of books of some titles that might be interesting to read for our June title. Each suggested title has a a few hyperlinks to information. I tried to pick titles based on something Angelhair pointed out on Monday - we have to love it before we can hate it. Therefore I decided to shelf my recommendation that we read "Diet for a Dead Planet" ;) and stick with books that tell a great story.

I can't wait to see what other people's suggestions are for next month! Angelhair had lots of good books with her that we flipped through on Monday.

We should also start thinking of a date. The nicer the weather gets, the harder it will be to get everyone together.


The Language of Baklava by Diana Abu-Jaber
Powell's
BarnesandNoble.com
Amazon

Abu-Jaber is an associate professor of English at Portland State University. This memoir about her childhood split between New York state and Jordan is rich in tales of her food-obsessed father and the ritual of food.

I started reading this book the day after the May book club meeting and I've been hungry all week. And not hungry for any kind of food - but Middle Eastern food. Last night, I couldn't take it any more so I spent a couple hours in the kitchen making ouzi, lentil soup, kofta, hummus and baba ganouj. Now that I'm full (well, I am still craving konafa) I can finally get back to reading.

The Gastronomical Me by MFK Fisher
Powell's
BarnesandNoble.com
Amazon

IMO, Fisher is one of the great American writers of the 20th century - in any genre. Forthright and humorous, this story follows her from her early life in California to Paris in the 1930s. Her wild streak shows through in everything she does. And while she may have cooked, she was first and foremost an eater.

Candy Freak by Steve Almond
Powell's
BarnesandNoble.com
Amazon

Among other things, Steve Almond is obsessed with candy. He claims he's eaten a candy bar every day of his life. Almond looks at the surviving small candy companies who made the confections of his youth and the big business of candy. I've read a couple of his other books and Almond's style is frenzied and high energy - at times manic.
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#59 LaTauladelBonMenjar

LaTauladelBonMenjar
  • Members
  • 511 posts
  • Location:SE PDX
  • Interests:Humankind's attempts at creating beauty in our day-to-day lives, including food and drink, decorative and fine arts, fashion, architecture and design, graciousness, generosity and humor.

Posted 19 May 2006 - 03:34 PM

Hi guys -

I put together a short list of books of some titles that might be interesting to read for our June title. Each suggested title has a a few hyperlinks to information. I tried to pick titles based on something Angelhair pointed out on Monday - we have to love it before we can hate it. Therefore I decided to shelf my recommendation that we read "Diet for a Dead Planet" ;) and stick with books that tell a great story.

I can't wait to see what other people's suggestions are for next month! Angelhair had lots of good books with her that we flipped through on Monday.

We should also start thinking of a date. The nicer the weather gets, the harder it will be to get everyone together.


The Language of Baklava by Diana Abu-Jaber
Powell's
BarnesandNoble.com
Amazon

Abu-Jaber is an associate professor of English at Portland State University. This memoir about her childhood split between New York state and Jordan is rich in tales of her food-obsessed father and the ritual of food.

I started reading this book the day after the May book club meeting and I've been hungry all week. And not hungry for any kind of food - but Middle Eastern food. Last night, I couldn't take it any more so I spent a couple hours in the kitchen making ouzi, lentil soup, kofta, hummus and baba ganouj. Now that I'm full (well, I am still craving konafa) I can finally get back to reading.

The Gastronomical Me by MFK Fisher
Powell's
BarnesandNoble.com
Amazon

IMO, Fisher is one of the great American writers of the 20th century - in any genre. Forthright and humorous, this story follows her from her early life in California to Paris in the 1930s. Her wild streak shows through in everything she does. And while she may have cooked, she was first and foremost an eater.

Candy Freak by Steve Almond
Powell's
BarnesandNoble.com
Amazon

Among other things, Steve Almond is obsessed with candy. He claims he's eaten a candy bar every day of his life. Almond looks at the surviving small candy companies who made the confections of his youth and the big business of candy. I've read a couple of his other books and Almond's style is frenzied and high energy - at times manic.


One vote for The Gastronomical Me. Looks like it could be as good a A Moveable Feast which is called Paris Was a Party in the Spanish version -- so much for good translation.

#60 vj

vj
  • Moderator
  • 2,747 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Albina (NE Pdx)

Posted 19 May 2006 - 03:35 PM

Here are some more ideas, some of which are actually Niki or Rachel's books....

Jim Harrison: The Raw and the Cooked: Adventures of a Roving Gourmand

"The idea is to eat well and not die from it-for the simple reason that that would be the end of your eating..."
http://www.amazon.co...glance&n=283155

from amazon:
Jim Harrison's The Raw and the Cooked extols our profound (and precarious) relationship to what we eat, and to the natural world. Compiled from the author's much-loved Esquire, Smart, and Men's Journal columns, the book offers charging personal panoramas in the guise of food essays. In pieces with titles like "Conscious Dining," "Hunger, Real and Unreal," and "Repulsion and Grace," Harrison--a kind of dharma bum cum foodie--takes his readers into realms of taste and feeling, spirit and body. "We are often like autistic children," he writes, "unable to connect experiences, especially if we want something interesting to eat." A Michigan "outlander," he nonetheless travels wide and can tell of the "tummy thrills" engendered by trips to restaurants like Manhattan's Babbo, meals planned and meals remembered. But the journeys he likes best involve hunting or foraging, his personal salves: "I arrived home in a palsied state," he writes. "To set the brakes, I wandered for hours in the woods looking for morels. At one point I wandered three hours to find four morels. I did however gather enough to cook our annual spring rite, a simple sauté of the mushrooms, wild leeks and sweetbreads."

from powells:
Now, for the first time, all of Harrison's food writing is available in one volume. Any reader of Harrison's fiction is struck by the love for food, wine, and other sensual pleasures that permeates it — and anyone who has read his essays and journalism has encountered a food critic unlike any other: unpretentious, witty, and unabashedly passionate. The Raw and the Cooked delivers the long-awaited complete collection, from his Smart and Esquire columns, to present-day pieces including a lengthy correspondence with French gourmet Gerard Oberle and fabulous pieces on food in France and America for Men's Journal.

"Where is the food book?" is a question that never fails to come up at Harrison's readings. The Raw and the Cooked answers that question with a nine-course meal that will satisfy every appetite.

Other reviews:
NYT Book Review (Jane & Michael Stern: Pass the Bicarb: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...52C1A9679C8B63)
Tuscon Weekly
http://www.tucsonwee...02-28/book.html


The Nasty Bits : Collected Varietal Cuts, Usable Trim, Scraps, and Bones
by Anthony Bourdain


On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen by Harold McGee

The Curious Cook: More Kitchen Science and Lore by Harold McGee

Best Food Writing 2004 by Holly Hughes (or any year)

How to Read a French Fry
by Russ Parsons


The Apprentice : My Life in the Kitchen
by Jacques Pepin


Best Thing I Ever Tasted : The Secret of Food
by Sallie Tisdale


(I'll annotate these later... sorry!)

and all of Rachel's suggestions sound fine by me.