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#21 igorpop

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 03:21 PM

hey msg,
i think what u like is mexican style ceviche, marinated for hours on the citrus what is opposite to peruvian ceviche (i'm not saying is bad by any means, i just would call that an OVERCOOKED ceviche). In south america (peru, chile) ceviche is quickly tossed in the marinate, served and eat inmediatly because the whole idea of this dish is to eat FRESH RAW fish and get the best of its natural flavors.
thnx

igor

#22 Amanda

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 03:26 PM

Welcome to the site, igorpop.

Best regards,

Amanda

#23 ExtraMSG

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 04:16 PM

Perhaps. But I don't think that's it, igorpop. While I've never been to Peru, I'm not ignorant of the differences and I have eaten ceviches at many Peruvian places trying to do it in a more traditional style in several cities. Also, there are other dishes I love, such as Mexico's camarones aguachiles and Thailand's kung che nam pla, that are basically raw seafood in a lime marinade with no "cooking". So even if I grant that it's true that Peruvian ceviche should be as uncooked as this was (I've never seen it where it was still translucent on the outside -- where the outer flesh was just hinting at turning opaque), I don't think it was an issue of palate. It just wasn't enjoyable. The fish itself was bland while the leche de tigre was harsh (maybe even bitter).

It's one meal in the first week of being open, though, and I'll be back. I even recommended it to someone who lives up in that neighborhood as a new place to try.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

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Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#24 ExtraMSG

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 04:22 PM

btw, igor, is there some reason that you and biscuitsngravy seem to be posting from the same place and that Del Inti is the only restaurant you've posted about? You know, as should be obvious, I'm totally cool with industry people coming on here, discussing restaurants, discussing their own restaurant, etc, but it's lame if you're not open about it. And it could facilitate a better discussion and more opportunity for learning if you were to say who you are and what your interest is in the place.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

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Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#25 ExtraMSG

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 04:34 PM

I just spent a few minutes searching google images for Peruvian ceviches that were as raw as what I had at Del Inti. Maybe all the places I've been in the US were making it for an American palate influenced by Mexican ceviche? Who knows? I couldn't find any that were as raw. Closest I saw were these:

http://www.westhampt.....cture 153.jpg

http://web.mit.edu/s...ima/ceviche.jpg

http://lh5.ggpht.com...Hg/P5170075.JPG

All of these are more "cooked" than what I had at Del Inti.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#26 Markovitch

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 06:08 PM

When I was in Peru, I noticed that you got super raw-ish ceviches when you could still see la playa from the place you were ordering. When you got further inland, it was more of a safety issue that they were cooked more thoroughly. What I mean is I saw one or two inland that were 'cooking' as little as what I saw on the beach, but they weren't getting as much business (from everyone).

#27 igorpop

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 06:19 PM

hey, hey!
easy man! I'm not saying you are ignorant or anything like that, and I'm not trying to hide who i am but your web ask me for a "name" and I thought that was the "fun" part of it...That's how we like ceviche, that's how we will serve it. (it is possible you got a bad lime on yours)
I welcome you to come back and try it again but this time let me know who you are 'cause as you said it's lame not to do so.
thanks

Ignacio del Solar
chef/owner
del Inti Restaurant

#28 Amanda

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 07:34 PM

Thank you for the honest disclosure.

Best regards,

Amanda

#29 ExtraMSG

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 07:43 PM

The problem is, I don't necessarily want you to know who I am because I want to be treated just like anyone else. But like I said, I'll be back, and I'll be truly hoping to enjoy the food.

As I said, it was a promising meal and I think you guys have a lot of potential. I don't expect a restaurant to be perfect ever, or even near their potential so early on. I was looking for potential and that's what I got. I don't feel like I wasted my money. In a month, I'll be hoping for more. But as long as things progress, you use good ingredients, and the menu sounds good, I'll be there.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#30 igorpop

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 08:37 PM

The problem is, I don't necessarily want you to know who I am because I want to be treated just like anyone else. But like I said, I'll be back, and I'll be truly hoping to enjoy the food.

As I said, it was a promising meal and I think you guys have a lot of potential. I don't expect a restaurant to be perfect ever, or even near their potential so early on. I was looking for potential and that's what I got. I don't feel like I wasted my money. In a month, I'll be hoping for more. But as long as things progress, you use good ingredients, and the menu sounds good, I'll be there.

You misunderstood me, I don't wanna give you special attention....all our costomers get the same, they are all special, but you know me and as you said probably we'll have a better conversation, extramsg!

#31 chefken

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 06:21 AM

The problem is, I don't necessarily want you to know who I am...


You can't mistake him...He's the one with the beautiful wife, looking at his seviche instead. ;)
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#32 BaconLuv

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 08:20 AM

Does anyone know if Del Inti takes reservations? I don't see anything on their website about it.

Related, is there a thread that's simply a list of restaurants that take reservations and which don't? (I couldn't find anything by searching). Sure would be a handy quick reference.
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#33 truffled

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 09:38 AM

Hi - I'm new here. Great forum!

Has anyone been to Del Inti recently? My hubby & I go to dinner with friends once a month, trying a new restaurant each time. I've suggested Del Inti for our dinner this month, and I'm curious to know if anyone has been there more recently than the September visits I just read about.

Also, can someone tell me if their cocktails are any good? Wine list?

Thanks much for your help!

#34 Amanda

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 10:58 AM

Welcome to the board, truffled!

Best regards,

Amanda

#35 Calabrese

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 12:29 PM

http://www.portlandm...eview-del-inti/ Calhoon

"Potatoes and chiles from the Incas. Limes, cheeses, and olives from the Spaniards. Soy and ginger from the Chinese. Seafood from the Japanese. Combinations that at first may sound like a gimmick in nouveau cuisine are in fact the savory-sweet (and little-known) hallmarks of Peruvian food. "

#36 Angelhair

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 08:13 AM

Del Inti is on Groupon today:

$15 for $35 Worth of Northwest‚?"Peruvian Fusion Fare at del Inti Restaurant

http://www.groupon.c...source=uu429075

#37 ExtraMSG

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 11:04 PM

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Had an excellent meal at Del Inti the other night. Nearly everything was truly delicious.

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Started with the causa con ostras fritas, mashed potatoes topped with mashed avocados and fried oysters. This was fantastic, probably better than any causa I've had at Andina. The texture of the potatoes was terrific, light, creamy, accented with lime and chile. Avocado added a creamy, rich layer. The oysters were fried wonderfully, crisp in a tempura-like batter and soft as butter inside. A bit of vinegared veggies topped the whole dish which helped brighten it.

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Next were the anticuchos. A chicken version was available, but we got the beef hearts. These had a great crust, were left tender and juicy inside, and had a subtly bright marinade that worked perfectly with the intensely beefy meat. Just great. Same garnish as before.

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We ordered both of the ceviches, asking for the mixto -- octopus, shrimp, and mussels in an aji amarillo leche de tigre* -- with our appetizers. Sharply citrusy and just as fiery. Each of the pieces of seafood were very nice. I'd prefer the octopus and shrimp to be cured rather than poached, but they were tender and very clean tasting, as good as what you'd expect in better sushi restaurants in town. The mussels were tender and mild. Both large kernels of starchy corn and toasted pieces of nutty corn dotted the dish. A nicely cooked piece of sweet potato was on the side. Red onion slices that seemed to have been blanched to keep them from being harsh were tossed in with the seafood.

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My wife got the other ceviche, the camarones chiferos, as her main dish. It had shrimp with mango, pickled daikon, and carrots in a passion fruit leche de tigre. Very nice. You had a nice mix of sweet and tart flavors. The marinade was still strongly citrusy like the previous one, but the heat and brightness were offset to a degree by the fruity sweetness. Very good. Daikon and carrots and some enjoyable texture and flavor variation. Fried onions garnished the ceviche.

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For my main, I got the seco a la nortena, braised lamb shoulder in aji amarillo, cumin, garlic and cilantro on canary beans. You can't really get the scale of this dish, but it was a very fair portion for under $20, not small, but not especially large. It also came with a very good side of white rice. The dish came with an entirely unnecessary steak knife. Each chunk of lamb was perfectly fork tender, not falling to shreds, but just at the point the connective tissues were melted, leaving it tender but not dry. The meat was coated in sauce giving it a lot of flavor. the beans were a little cold, probably not re-heated all the way and served on a cold plate, but they were cooked perfectly, soft, but not mushy, and coated in sauce as well. Very tasty dish.

Posted Image

We finished with the alfajores. Pastry options are boring -- these shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche, a stumptown coffee creme brulee, and rice pudding. These were fine. I couldn't tell, though, if they were just using a commercial dulce de leche to fill them. I probably wouldn't get dessert here again.

Very good meal overall. Prices seem fair. It's a nice room and they have a good patio. I've had a hard time lining up my availability with their availability, but I look forward to more meals there.










* The term "leche de tigre" is interesting to me and I made some off-color speculations to my wife that she doubted. The literal translation is "tiger's milk". However, I know that leche de tigre is served solo, taken as a sort of constitutional, something to either cure a hangover or get the motor running, so to speak -- a tasty viagra alternative. However, the translation here doesn't really make sense. Milk? Yeah, maybe, I guess. But it sounds pretty feminine for a constitutional. But there is another, much more masculine, meaning for "leche" -- a slang meaning, at least, in some Hispanic cultures. Instead of the milk of a female, it's the milk of a male. You know, semen. A tiger (and it's also sometimes called leche de pantera -- panther's milk) is a pretty virile, masculine animal. I'm sure it's man milk is especially virile. Much more potent than sloth's "milk" or rabbit's "milk". So, I suggested that it's not milk at all, but "milk", ie, semen. My wife rolled her eyes, but I think it makes sense. I can't find anything in English or Spanish on the interwebs to tell me for sure in my little bit of googling, but hell, male animal genitalia always seems to be eaten with the reasoning that it'll make you strong or potent, so I think my interpretation makes a hell of a lot more sense than the literal one.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#38 vrunka

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 11:48 AM

Tried this place for the first time last night as we just happened to be nearby. I really liked it a lot and hope to get a chance to try more of their menu.

I don't know how often they change their menu, but it's currently pretty different from what other people have posted -- though very much the same in tone and general concept.

We had a Causa Limena, Empanada and Pasta a lo Macho -- a spicy seafood pasta.

The Causa was my favorite dish of the night. The only other time I ever had causa was at Andina which I remember being kind of gummy and bland. not here. It was served with crispy, very fresh fried prawns and, as emsg says above, the potatoes were incredibly light and flavorful. So good.

The empanada was also excellent: very light and flaky pastry bursting with seafood.

I liked the Pasta a lo Macho -- it was a fairly small portion, but chock full of fresh seafood. Great flavors in the sauce, too. But it was seriously salty. So salty, in fact, that Mr. V couldn't eat more than a few bites. I'm sort of a sodium fiend, though, so I ate until my temples were throbbing and my hands swelled up. No joke.

Despite that, though, I had an overall nice experience. It's a lovely space with both covered and uncovered patio seating, comfortable booths inside and a cozy-looking fire pit out front. I see that they do happy hour until 7 (which is darn civilized) so I will probably visit again soon and try more of the menu.

#39 Dan

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 04:48 PM

Bumping this long-dormant thread to say that more people need to check out this restaurant. I was there with a party of 7 on Friday night, and was very impressed. We ordered maybe half of the dishes on the menu, and I thought everything we ordered was beautifully conceived (though for all I know, it's just Peruvian standards) and executed.

A couple of standouts for me: an heirloom tomato salad dressed with (I think) vinegar and citrus, a crispy slab of pork belly served on top of mashed purple potatoes, savory corn pudding with duck confit (yum), and a grilled tombo dish. Even the quinoa salad was great, and I am really not a fan of quinoa.

Service was also very friendly, helpful, and came back to the table at appropriate intervals.

Frankly, I'm surprised there isn't more talk about this restaurant here - would love to hear other people's thoughts.

#40 ExtraMSG

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 09:36 PM

They're closing. Sucks. Do nice restaurants ever do well on Alberta?

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's