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Iced Coffee


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#21 vj

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 04:52 AM

Hey, speaking, when does the new Ristretto open? Neighborhood people are thirsty!

#22 jennifer

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Posted 18 July 2008 - 02:12 PM

The coffee shop I was in all week in SF cold-brews the iced coffee. They called it Kyoto-style iced coffee. They said it's a 20-hour process to brew one pot. There's a big glass globe of water that drips into the beans, kind of like an IV drip. Hours later, the coffee starts to drip into the pot, I guess after the beans are completely saturated. it was the smoothest coffee I'd ever had, not one hint of bitter.

This shop also did a siphon pot for hot coffee. It was fascinating to watch. And their espresso was as mellow an complex as wine, so many different aromas and things going on.

Blue Bottle Cafe next to the old Mint in SF, off Mission and Mint.

They're doing things there I've never seen before.

I posted a link to an article on this shop from the NYT in the "restaurants elsewhere" section, san francisco.

#23 duck833

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Posted 18 July 2008 - 02:30 PM

"They're doing things there I've never seen before. "

Sounds like the Folsom District of SF.

#24 Guest_MostlyRunning_*

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Posted 18 July 2008 - 06:56 PM

The coffee shop I was in all week in SF cold-brews the iced coffee. They called it Kyoto-style iced coffee. They said it's a 20-hour process to brew one pot. There's a big glass globe of water that drips into the beans, kind of like an IV drip. Hours later, the coffee starts to drip into the pot, I guess after the beans are completely saturated. it was the smoothest coffee I'd ever had, not one hint of bitter.

This shop also did a siphon pot for hot coffee. It was fascinating to watch. And their espresso was as mellow an complex as wine, so many different aromas and things going on.

Blue Bottle Cafe next to the old Mint in SF, off Mission and Mint.

They're doing things there I've never seen before.

I posted a link to an article on this shop from the NYT in the "restaurants elsewhere" section, san francisco.


Blue Bottle is doing some really interesting things with brewing techniques. It's been more than a year since I've tasted their coffee, but they go a lot darker with their roast levels than I typically like, and the last few bags of their stuff I tasted were past-prime and tasted really baggy. Still, they're getting lots of attention and hopefully that will help them purchase better green and push the SF coffee scene a little bit more.

#25 Guest_MostlyRunning_*

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Posted 18 July 2008 - 07:04 PM

I'm going to speak what will be taken as heresy by many members of this board; I don't like Stumptown Coffee. I think it's overpriced and overrated. We get the coffee at work from Bridgetown and pay $6.85 a pound in 5lb bags (Bridgetown Blend). They sell it retail for a buck a pound more. Coffee snobs, and I consider myself one, love it. We have a commercial Bunn pour over machine.


I'm not going to say it's heresy, and I'm not going to try to argue against overrated, but Stumptown coffee is not overpriced. Comparing Bridgetown to Stumptown is like comparing Burger King to Castagna. You might prefer one flavor, you might find the quality to price ratio out of whack, but the ingredients (the beans) that Stumptown uses are of a completely different caliber than what Bridgetown uses. Bridgetown can sell their beans for <$7 a pound because they pay basement prices for low quality beans. Stumptown is pretty transparent about what they pay for their beans, and the mark up is industry standard or below. I would be guessing, but I am pretty confident that Bridgetown's markup is higher than Stumptown's.

#26 polloelastico

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Posted 18 July 2008 - 11:17 PM

So, do you have a preference for hot or cold brewed iced coffee? A secret recipe that you're willing to reveal? A favorite iced coffee drink? How do you get your caffeine buzz on when it's hot?

I'm almost embarrassed to admit this, but this is what I use to make my ice coffee.
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I started using this contraption in high school to drip-brew Vietnamese coffee into a glass, which to I then add ice cubes, a douse of cream, and a teaspoon of sweetened condensed milk (commercially available ice coffee at Viet restaurants are way too sweet for my tastes).

It was passed on to me when I moved out of my parents' house, and still serves me to this day. I've purchased newer filters over the years, but nothing seems to work as well as this POS, which for all I know cost pennies and was hammered out some time around the fall of Saigon.
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#27 Angelhair

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 09:42 AM

Anyone have a great method for cold brew coffee?

 

I just bought this thingy and the first couple of pots have been fine using the method described in the listing. 

https://smile.amazon...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

What kind coffee should I be using-- I am looking for smooth drinkability and low acidity?



#28 pwillen1

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 10:18 AM

For low acidity use a paper filter like on a pour over or aeropress then chill. Extraction blows below 195F. then you can dilute as desired.


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#29 StMaximo

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 09:46 PM

The advantage of cold extraction is convenience. It's not the most economical method. The cold extraction also gives a different flavor profile too. I think it's more what Angehair is after.

 

Try a medium dark roast Sumatran, Guatemalan or El Salvadoran. The darker roasts tend to have less acidity and some sweetness from the roasting. If you get a really oily roast you get some bitterness from the deep roast.

 

I used to do cold extraction, but find I like the flavor of brewing it hot over ice better. I used to use an Aeropress and it worked great. Now I have an automatic espresso machine and when I want iced coffee I brew directly into a cup full of ice.

 

Before the purists step in....I know the auto machines don't make as good of espresso, but for my taste it's good enough for my daily needs and it's really convenient. I also go through a lot less beans than I did with the Aeropress.