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Summer Reading for Foodies


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#21 Jill-O

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 07:26 PM

I'm done with A Geography of Oysters and will be returning it to the library this weekend: If you're the next one up for it in the holds HERE IT COMES, JILL-O!


It's already waiting for me to pick it up at Hillsdale! ;o)

It figures...three books I put on hold came up in the same week! "The Sharper Your Knife..." is going along pretty quick, though. Then I have "Service Included..." to read and the oyster book (after I pick it up, I have until the 10th). Still waiting for "The Taste of Sweet" and a Charles De Lint book (my first, I haven't read him before).

This is all in addition to "The Yiddish Policeman's Union" that was lent to me recently.

Sorry, got to go, I have some reading to do! :angry:
Never give up! Never surrender!

#22 LadyConcierge

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 06:53 AM

I'm reading 5 Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris, who wrote Chocolat.

It would be a good book club read if everyone hasn't read it already.

#23 Plump_and_Juicy

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 08:16 AM

Not new, but I was just reading about "In The Devil's Garden" the other day - it's all about the history of food taboos.


Is it well-written, MaBell? Maybe we could read it for a book club selection.

#24 Amanda

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 12:46 PM

I read 5 Quarters of the Orange a year or two ago and thought it was good.

Best regards,

Amanda

#25 jemangepdx

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 12:29 PM

I just started reading 'Heat: An Amateur's Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker, and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany' and so far it's amusing. But I'm only 25 pages in :)

Synopsis: Writer and editor, Bill Buford left his job at The New Yorker for a most unlikely destination: the kitchen at Babbo, the revolutionary Italian restaurant created and ruled by superstar chef Mario Batali.

#26 Amanda

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 12:31 PM

We had Heat as a book club book year before last, I believe. That was a good book!

Best regards,

Amanda

#27 Angelhair

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 09:09 AM

The NY Times tells us there's Nothing to Eat:

http://www.nytimes.c...amp;oref=slogin

The author of The End of Oil says, "the food system can only truly be understood as an economic system."

#28 Angelhair

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 02:10 PM

I am very much enjoying The Man Who Ate the World:

http://www.npr.org/t...toryId=92635113

It's not going to change your life, but it's a light and fun summer read.

#29 Amanda

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 03:43 PM

Well, I checked out a book called "Stuffed & Starved" by Raj Patel someone told me about. YIKES! Not only is it NOT a light summer read, but the first chapter is all about the suicide rates of farmers worldwide. I know it would be good if I slogged through it and learned something, but that's not going to happen. I'll throw myself off a bridge in despair before I get halfway through it, I fear.

So...it's back to the two oyster books I'm reading. "Heaven on the Half Shell" and "Consider the Oyster - A Shucker's Field Guide". Neither are the common interpretation of a beach read, but the essence of the sea is the heart of both books. Not only that, but the death of oysters is much more palatable to me than the death of poor farmers who work their fingers to the bone for naught.

Best regards,

Amanda

#30 tonyajonemiller

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 08:33 AM

Gourmet Girl mystery series

Fun, food-centric summer novels!
Tonya (NSFW)
Chef Crush...Because I heart cooks...

#31 wavygravy

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 03:13 PM

Iím reading ďThe Sushi EconomyĒ by Sasha Issenberg. Itís a fascinating overview of how the global boom in sushi came about, and how a handful of brilliant marketers and chefs helped make it happen. Itís also an interesting mini-lesson in the global economy, and how advances in computers, communications, air transport and freezing all play a part in getting us where we are. A bluefin tuna can be caught off New England, and be served in a sushi bar in Tokyo about 36 hours or less after hitting the dock.

For sushi lovers (Iím not, but this tempts me), I think itís a must read.

#32 wavygravy

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 10:51 AM

Sushi Economy is interestig, but maybe not light enough. OK, try Jeff Steingarten's "The Man Who Ate Everything". He writes about food and travel for Vogue, and this collection is really witty and entertaining. $10 at Amazon. Also, maybe it's getting a little dated, but Calvin Trillin's trilogy on eating, ("American Fried", etc) can be picked up used for cheap. Excerpts from his three books have been put together in a book called "The Tummy Trilogy".