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How many ounces to a "glass" of wine?


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#1 chefasaurus

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 05:02 PM

I've always known a glass of wine to be six ounces, but I've noticed lately that pours around town seem to be a bit light. I worked one place here in PDX where they did 4.5 glasses and offered a 1/4 bottle glass (about 7 ounces). Seemed like a rip-off to me. I was in a wine bar on the east side the other day and ordered a glass of wine. It came in the same Riedel I use at my job, so I know where the 6 oz mark is. The glass was probably somewhere between 4 1/2 and 5 oz. I felt cheated considering the glass of wine cost 9 bucks.

So what do you consider the norm for a glass of wine?

#2 ExtraMSG

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 05:21 PM

http://dinersjournal.../01/fill-er-up/

Which raises the question: is five ounces a standard pour?
Yes, for the most part, and itís a sensible pour, and sometimes, when you feel cheated, itís because you got less than that. Sometimes itís because the glass is so big that the volume of wine in it looks small. Context and optical illusion play parts in whether you feel youíve been treated well.

Five-ounce pours allow restaurants to get five glasses out of a bottle, which has a bit more than 25 ounces in it. But some restaurants give six-ounce pours (perhaps priced accordingly) and figure on four glasses per bottle, with an ounce or so of ďangel shareĒ left over. Thatís what Robert Bohr, the sommelier at Cru, called the excess amount that somehow disappears, as if it just evaporates, as if unseen forces consume it.


I have our "test glass" marked at 5 oz, I think. Maybe 6.

I've had people complain about it, though.
The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

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#3 GizmoCat

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 05:24 PM

I've always known a glass of wine to be six ounces, but I've noticed lately that pours around town seem to be a bit light. I worked one place here in PDX where they did 4.5 glasses and offered a 1/4 bottle glass (about 7 ounces). Seemed like a rip-off to me. I was in a wine bar on the east side the other day and ordered a glass of wine. It came in the same Riedel I use at my job, so I know where the 6 oz mark is. The glass was probably somewhere between 4 1/2 and 5 oz. I felt cheated considering the glass of wine cost 9 bucks.

So what do you consider the norm for a glass of wine?


From a winery standpoint, we always considered a glass to be 5 oz.....5 pours to a bottle.

Also, if a Riedel glass is used, the wine should be poured to the point were the glass is at it's widest point, for the most part...although that can vary with the more expensive series, which is about five ounces.

I tried to look this up on OLCC....but it wasn't easy to find. I think it is 5 ounces, but that may have changed.

#4 Will

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 05:51 PM

I tried to look this up on OLCC....but it wasn't easy to find. I think it is 5 ounces, but that may have changed.


When I took my OLCC course last fall, it was still 5 ounces.

#5 chefasaurus

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 11:48 PM


I tried to look this up on OLCC....but it wasn't easy to find. I think it is 5 ounces, but that may have changed.


When I took my OLCC course last fall, it was still 5 ounces.


wow, they never mentioned anything about wine ounces in my OLCC class. Interesting.

Thanks everyone.

#6 StMaximo

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 04:59 AM



I tried to look this up on OLCC....but it wasn't easy to find. I think it is 5 ounces, but that may have changed.


When I took my OLCC course last fall, it was still 5 ounces.


wow, they never mentioned anything about wine ounces in my OLCC class. Interesting.

Thanks everyone.


I know a couple of local restaurants that used to figure 6+ ounces per glass or 4 glasses per bottle

#7 gal4giants

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 01:12 PM

We do 6 oz pours, 4 glasses per bottle. Our glasses are huge (15 oz) ...many o' customer have tried to complain until I show them what's up..nearly filling the wine glass with a pint of water.


I won't go to restaurants that give me 4 oz, unless the price point reflects the lack of onces but it never does. Same thing with 14 oz pints for my beer....just tacky & cheap...they don't deserve my dough.

#8 MILKMAN

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 01:31 PM

I took the test recently and OLCC says, that a standard 16oz beer equals 1oz shot of liquor which equals 5oz wine that's the standard pour. Our glasses are hugh as well, 22oz Riedel,(I use a full wine bottle to show how much the glass holds, it's very decieving) but people love them...
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#9 StMaximo

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 03:32 PM

I took the test recently and OLCC says, that a standard 16oz beer equals 1oz shot of liquor which equals 5oz wine that's the standard pour. Our glasses are hugh as well, 22oz Riedel,(I use a full wine bottle to show how much the glass holds, it's very decieving) but people love them...


The OLCC server classes don't define a standard restaurant serving. The "Standard" serving they are talking about is the "how many drinks an hour by a XXX lb person" will get you lit. Standard beer is something like Budweiser not a higher gravity ale.

#10 greycoral

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 04:34 PM

In every restaurant I've worked in, we've poured 6 oz. pours. I feel cheated if I don't get that.
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#11 concreteoatmeal

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Posted 27 May 2008 - 07:55 PM

im firmly in the 6oz camp.....5 is just being chisel-y IMO. with markups on some BTG wines approaching 400%, attempting to squeeze your customers out of an ounce is just bad form.....and to which i say BOOOOOO..... :P
"If you were expecting a kick in the groin, and you get a slap in the face.......thats a win where I come from"

#12 Amanda

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 06:49 AM

I prefer a 6 oz pour, as well.

Best regards,

Amanda

#13 MILKMAN

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 09:37 AM

im firmly in the 6oz camp.....5 is just being chisel-y IMO. with markups on some BTG wines approaching 400%, attempting to squeeze your customers out of an ounce is just bad form.....and to which i say BOOOOOO..... :P

So what do you think the mark up is on regular alcohol vs wine? Well drinks for instance there are 25oz in a $7 bottle at $3 to $4 a shot. Add over pours here & there and you got 15 to 20 shots in a bottle, there's $45 to $80 profit on a $7 bottle. Take another $3 away for things like soda, fruit, an olive. Why do you think most reataurants go to full liquor. Why do you think the majority of places can afford to do "Happy Hour". You don't think they're making money on $3 apps?
Gilt Club is a pefect example for industry people. All food after 10pm is 40% off. He is banking on those to buy enough alcohol to cover any loss. Trust me when I say he does well. Look at Stanfords, Newport Bay, and their other companies $2.95 apps but only at the bar and it's usually from 4 to 6 and 9 to close.
So do the math, it cost the owner about 28 cents a shot. Twenty-eight cents!!! Talk about being chisel-y. Justify that one. You should feel even more cheated.

And all the owner does is pick bottles off the shelf at the liquor store and he gets 5% off everything. Sure there may be a few other things he has to do but I really can't think of much more then that.

Wine is a totally different story... I have to make time for the distributor to come see me usually 2 hours before I really have to be there but I do it every Thursday to meet with about 7 different people to try different wines, continually changing the wine list. Then I have to know what I'm selling, where it's from, about the winemaker so I can have the right answers when a customer ask us about the wine... Trying to find the perfect bottle that's going to blow my customers away. So, depending on what I decide on there are a lot of factors that play in this wine has only a 2 to 3 day self life once it's opened. So if you open a bottle and sell one glass out it business is slow or no one else orders a galss of that bottle in that time you have to throw the rest out because it's gone bad (that happens a lot if your not careful). Where as hard liquor never goes bad, and there are hundreds of different drinks you can make with a bottle rum. Where sometimes finding a good wine can be a shot in the dark and if it doesn't sell it could end up down the drain. And that kind of cost can be very expensive.
Stuart Herold Welcome To Wine Down

#14 gustoeater

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 12:24 PM

Generally speaking, when a place is selling wine by the glass, how long is the bottle able to be kept before spoiling?

#15 duck833

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 12:56 PM

Generally speaking, when a place is selling wine by the glass, how long is the bottle able to be kept before spoiling?


depends on the wine. Some young Pinot Noir's actually get better after opening on day two and three.

#16 GizmoCat

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 06:57 PM


Generally speaking, when a place is selling wine by the glass, how long is the bottle able to be kept before spoiling?


depends on the wine. Some young Pinot Noir's actually get better after opening on day two and three.


Yep, two, maybe three days. If you have a cuvinet (sp) you may get a bit more. Some wines are toast after one day...especially bubbles. Open a large bottle of sparkling and you best hope you sell it soon.

Also, in answer to the "legal pour". Here is the response I received from OLCC:

"Oregon does not have a legal pour size for wine (or any alcohol).

The drink equation; that is:

1.5 ounces of distilled spirits = 5 ounces of wine = 12 ounces of malt beverage (beer).

The drink equation is meant to help servers determine how much alcohol a person is consuming and thus allow the server to better monitor how much alcohol is being served to one person. The equation is not a
limit. It is meant to be a helpful guide."

#17 cdevs

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 10:21 PM

Also, in answer to the "legal pour". Here is the response I received from OLCC:

"Oregon does not have a legal pour size for wine (or any alcohol).

The drink equation; that is:

1.5 ounces of distilled spirits = 5 ounces of wine = 12 ounces of malt beverage (beer).

The drink equation is meant to help servers determine how much alcohol a person is consuming and thus allow the server to better monitor how much alcohol is being served to one person. The equation is not a
limit. It is meant to be a helpful guide."


So following that equation, a six-ounce pour would be equivalent to a 14.4 oz beer, which is reasonably close to the amount you can fit in a 16 oz shaker pint glass with little or no foam.

We use the same teardrop-style glass that we for both reds and whites -- I call it the "unisex" glass -- and it's a six-ounce pour into a nine-ounce glass. It seems to work well for our particular clientele.

(Slightly off topic, but a 16oz pint glass actually does hold 16 oz of water, but only if you titrate it in very gently and don't disturb the surface pressure. The meniscus needs to basically protrude out of the glass.)


-Charlie Devereux
Double Mountain Brewery & Taproom


#18 Calabrese

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 04:32 AM

We use the same teardrop-style glass that we for both reds and whites -- I call it the "unisex" glass -- and it's a six-ounce pour into a nine-ounce glass. It seems to work well for our particular clientele.
-Charlie Devereux
Double Mountain Brewery & Taproom



I know you are not fine dining Charlie, but ugh to unisex glasses. Wine is admittedly my one of my passions. The the right glass for the wine is analogous to the right tool for the job. :)

#19 StMaximo

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 08:44 AM

We use the same teardrop-style glass that we for both reds and whites -- I call it the "unisex" glass -- and it's a six-ounce pour into a nine-ounce glass. It seems to work well for our particular clientele.
-Charlie Devereux
Double Mountain Brewery & Taproom



I know you are not fine dining Charlie, but ugh to unisex glasses. Wine is admittedly my one of my passions. The the right glass for the wine is analogous to the right tool for the job. :wub:


I think that there are some good all purpose glasses (note to Calabrese - I said "good" not "great") - but 6 oz of wine in a 9 oz glass is too much in my opinion. I have a couple of dishwasher racks of 36 each of the 10 1/2 ounce INAO glasses that hold 3 or 4 ounces nicely and at my house you get to refill them freely until the wine runs out (never happened so far) or you can't walk (happens too frequently)

I also understand having nice glasses that match the wine and I have a few, but I don't have the room to store a couple of dozen of each type in order to serve a crowd when the need arises.

#20 GizmoCat

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 05:44 PM


We use the same teardrop-style glass that we for both reds and whites -- I call it the "unisex" glass -- and it's a six-ounce pour into a nine-ounce glass. It seems to work well for our particular clientele.
-Charlie Devereux
Double Mountain Brewery & Taproom



I know you are not fine dining Charlie, but ugh to unisex glasses. Wine is admittedly my one of my passions. The the right glass for the wine is analogous to the right tool for the job. :wub:


I think that there are some good all purpose glasses (note to Calabrese - I said "good" not "great") - but 6 oz of wine in a 9 oz glass is too much in my opinion. I have a couple of dishwasher racks of 36 each of the 10 1/2 ounce INAO glasses that hold 3 or 4 ounces nicely and at my house you get to refill them freely until the wine runs out (never happened so far) or you can't walk (happens too frequently)

I also understand having nice glasses that match the wine and I have a few, but I don't have the room to store a couple of dozen of each type in order to serve a crowd when the need arises.


If you had a Riedel (or any other brand with similar shapes) the Riesling/Sangiovese glass is great for red & white...very multi-purpose. This saves people from having to have tons of different glasses.