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How do you clean and store your Silpat or Exopat?


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#1 jafar

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 01:45 PM

I've been using my silicone baking mat on a half sheet to hold my dough as it proof's and then to transfer it to my dutch oven for baking no-knead bread often lately.

I love the way the mats work for a variety of things but I always find them awkward to clean, dry and store. I'm wondering if there's a simple trick or just plain good idea. I'd probably use them more often if I didn't have the hassle of cleaning them.

Currently I wipe them with a soapy sponge, rinse them off (often 2 or 3 times because they touch the dirty sink or something during the process), and try to prop them somehow in a manner that they are able to mostly dry.

Later I'll roll them up and put a rubber band around them. (honestly my girlfriend is usually the one to clean them because I let them sit around dirty).

#2 Angelhair

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 01:50 PM

I've been using my silicone baking mat on a half sheet to hold my dough as it proof's and then to transfer it to my dutch oven for baking no-knead bread often lately.

I love the way the mats work for a variety of things but I always find them awkward to clean, dry and store. I'm wondering if there's a simple trick or just plain good idea. I'd probably use them more often if I didn't have the hassle of cleaning them.

Currently I wipe them with a soapy sponge, rinse them off (often 2 or 3 times because they touch the dirty sink or something during the process), and try to prop them somehow in a manner that they are able to mostly dry.

Later I'll roll them up and put a rubber band around them. (honestly my girlfriend is usually the one to clean them because I let them sit around dirty).


To wash, I swish them through a sink full of soapy water. I store them the same way that you do.

#3 katez0r

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 01:51 PM

I wash mine the same way, and store them flat on baking sheets. I'd love a good method for cleaning, too.

#4 jafar

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 02:14 PM


I've been using my silicone baking mat on a half sheet to hold my dough as it proof's and then to transfer it to my dutch oven for baking no-knead bread often lately.

I love the way the mats work for a variety of things but I always find them awkward to clean, dry and store. I'm wondering if there's a simple trick or just plain good idea. I'd probably use them more often if I didn't have the hassle of cleaning them.

Currently I wipe them with a soapy sponge, rinse them off (often 2 or 3 times because they touch the dirty sink or something during the process), and try to prop them somehow in a manner that they are able to mostly dry.

Later I'll roll them up and put a rubber band around them. (honestly my girlfriend is usually the one to clean them because I let them sit around dirty).


To wash, I swish them through a sink full of soapy water. I store them the same way that you do.


I seldom generate a sink full of soapy water.

#5 Angelhair

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 02:28 PM



I've been using my silicone baking mat on a half sheet to hold my dough as it proof's and then to transfer it to my dutch oven for baking no-knead bread often lately.

I love the way the mats work for a variety of things but I always find them awkward to clean, dry and store. I'm wondering if there's a simple trick or just plain good idea. I'd probably use them more often if I didn't have the hassle of cleaning them.

Currently I wipe them with a soapy sponge, rinse them off (often 2 or 3 times because they touch the dirty sink or something during the process), and try to prop them somehow in a manner that they are able to mostly dry.

Later I'll roll them up and put a rubber band around them. (honestly my girlfriend is usually the one to clean them because I let them sit around dirty).


To wash, I swish them through a sink full of soapy water. I store them the same way that you do.


I seldom generate a sink full of soapy water.


Well, I usually end up washing the sheet pans afterwards.

#6 Kathryn

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 07:47 PM

I wash my Silpat in soapy water and dry it off with a towel. I then roll it up and slip it into a cardboard tube (an empty paper towel roll). I can then either lay it down or it will stand up in the cupboard.

#7 piggly_wiggly

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 08:58 PM

I use the baking sheet as a work surface of sorts. I soap up both sides of silpat and baking sheet, rinse the top of the silpat, flip, rinse the bottom of the sheet pan, put rinsed side of silpat on rinsed back of sheet pan, exposing other soapy side, rinse, hold onto edges, flip, rinse pan, and then check for any more rinsing necessary.

I put the silpat back on the front side of sheet pan, use a towel to swipe bottom dry, hold pan in one hand, silpat in another, shake shake over sink, put sheet pan on counter, put silpat in pan, dry, lift to dry pan, flip silpat, dry other side.

Sounds complicated, but it's pretty fast. I also use a baby bottle brush, because they have more bristles at the head (and that attachment for the nipple is great for cleaning tiny spaces), I can throw them in the dishwasher on sanitize mode to keep them from getting smelly, and aside from glasses and other narrow containers, they hold a fair amount of suds, so they're great for a sink full of things that can't go in the dishwasher, very fast.

#8 jafar

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 09:44 PM

I use the baking sheet as a work surface of sorts. I soap up both sides of silpat and baking sheet, rinse the top of the silpat, flip, rinse the bottom of the sheet pan, put rinsed side of silpat on rinsed back of sheet pan, exposing other soapy side, rinse, hold onto edges, flip, rinse pan, and then check for any more rinsing necessary.

I put the silpat back on the front side of sheet pan, use a towel to swipe bottom dry, hold pan in one hand, silpat in another, shake shake over sink, put sheet pan on counter, put silpat in pan, dry, lift to dry pan, flip silpat, dry other side.

Sounds complicated, but it's pretty fast. I also use a baby bottle brush, because they have more bristles at the head (and that attachment for the nipple is great for cleaning tiny spaces), I can throw them in the dishwasher on sanitize mode to keep them from getting smelly, and aside from glasses and other narrow containers, they hold a fair amount of suds, so they're great for a sink full of things that can't go in the dishwasher, very fast.


Thanks piggly wiggly,

That's the kind of thing I was looking for. I like your process using the sheet pan. If I have a silpat and pan to wash at the same time I'll try it.

At least half the time I'm just washing the silpat though. I'll use them on a sheetpan under a pie I'm baking to catch the drips, or I'll put one on a sheet pan then a proofing bread dough covered by the overturned metal bowl. When I'm done the sheet pan is still clean as far as I'm concerned so I don't wash it again.

Besides, my sheet pans are pretty much glorified trays because I almost never use them without a lining of some sort. Usually that's the Silpat.

#9 piggly_wiggly

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 03:31 PM

At least half the time I'm just washing the silpat though. I'll use them on a sheetpan under a pie I'm baking to catch the drips, or I'll put one on a sheet pan then a proofing bread dough covered by the overturned metal bowl. When I'm done the sheet pan is still clean as far as I'm concerned so I don't wash it again.

Besides, my sheet pans are pretty much glorified trays because I almost never use them without a lining of some sort. Usually that's the Silpat.


I never use mine without a sheet pan, and even when it's relatively "clean", those bottle brushes hold so much suds that I can clean silpat and pan as quickly and as much soap as if I tried to wrangle a silpat all on it's own.

Besides, I'm a certifiably insane germophobe. :lol: