Jump to content


Photo

Thanksgiving Cooking


  • Please log in to reply
143 replies to this topic

Poll: Stuffing: in or out? (47 member(s) have cast votes)

Do you actually stuff your bird or cook the dressing in a separate dish?

  1. Of course, I stuff the bird! It's the way my mamma did it! (3 votes [6.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.38%

  2. Out of the bird! Stuffing is unsanitary and makes the dressing too moist. (26 votes [55.32%])

    Percentage of vote: 55.32%

  3. In and out...give the people a choice! (18 votes [38.30%])

    Percentage of vote: 38.30%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#21 Calabrese

Calabrese

    Desaparecido

  • Banned
  • 5,970 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gone

Posted 14 November 2006 - 06:35 AM

Jill-O sometimes bakes stuffing in muffin tins. What I like about that is that you get a a lot of crispy bits.

#22 Calabrese

Calabrese

    Desaparecido

  • Banned
  • 5,970 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gone

Posted 14 November 2006 - 11:37 PM

Mesquite Grilled Turkey Instructions.....

You need to use a Weber or or other closed kettle BBQ, with the air vents
full open, and indirect heat i.e coals stacked on the side of a drip pan
placed on the lower grill (where the coals usually go)- we use a std 8 x 11
pan for this.

start the coals a half hour before you put the bird on. use about 15-20
coals on each side of the drip pan, laid out in several layers if needed.
Once they are going, put the bird on the upper
grill, above the drip pan.

The bird cooks at 11 minutes per pound. Every half hour baste it using the
pan juices, which take an hour or more to appear. every hour add about
10 -12 more coals to each side.

#23 Angelhair

Angelhair
  • Moderator
  • 7,660 posts
  • Location:downtown
  • Interests:film, cooking, literature

Posted 15 November 2006 - 08:49 AM

The website Megnut http://www.megnut.com/ is doing a great overview of all the Thanksgiving food mags out there. Anyone cooking for the holiday this year should check it out.

Did anyone see the Sunday Morning segment on Gourmet picking a turkey for their cover? Really good stuff...funny too.

#24 Calabrese

Calabrese

    Desaparecido

  • Banned
  • 5,970 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gone

Posted 15 November 2006 - 11:34 AM

The website Megnut http://www.megnut.com/ is doing a great overview of all the Thanksgiving food mags out there. Anyone cooking for the holiday this year should check it out.

Did anyone see the Sunday Morning segment on Gourmet picking a turkey for their cover? Really good stuff...funny too.


Though it's not listed.... I always looked forward to Sunset's holiday issues esp. Thanksgiving. If foggy memory serves, we got the idea for mesquite grilled turkey from them.

#25 westslope97225

westslope97225
  • Members
  • 218 posts
  • Location:WestSlope / Beaverton
  • Interests:My wife, who is my food critic companion and I, like to find the best restaurants to eat at. <br />We thrive on good food at no expense!

Posted 15 November 2006 - 01:03 PM

Mesquite Grilled Turkey Instructions.....

You need to use a Weber or or other closed kettle BBQ, with the air vents
full open, and indirect heat i.e coals stacked on the side of a drip pan
placed on the lower grill (where the coals usually go)- we use a std 8 x 11
pan for this.

start the coals a half hour before you put the bird on. use about 15-20
coals on each side of the drip pan, laid out in several layers if needed.
Once they are going, put the bird on the upper
grill, above the drip pan.

The bird cooks at 11 minutes per pound. Every half hour baste it using the
pan juices, which take an hour or more to appear. every hour add about
10 -12 more coals to each side.


Thanks, for remembering to get it for me!

With the cold weather / rain ? Will your recipe still workout, ok?

Do you have an idea what the temp at the grill level where the bird is sitting should be?? and the ambient temp inside the kettle??

thanks again.

#26 Calabrese

Calabrese

    Desaparecido

  • Banned
  • 5,970 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gone

Posted 15 November 2006 - 01:47 PM

Thanks, for remembering to get it for me!

With the cold weather / rain ? Will your recipe still workout, ok?

Do you have an idea what the temp at the grill level where the bird is sitting should be?? and the ambient temp inside the kettle??

thanks again.


It's been cold and rainy many years that we've done this. It's not a problem. If it's wet a bit of shelter for the Weber is good.

I have no idea about the temperatures. The coals should be completely ashen before you start. And you will need to add new charcoal as you go.

#27 GreenPapaya

GreenPapaya
  • Members
  • 12 posts

Posted 15 November 2006 - 05:37 PM

This year I am doing a Italian sytle Thanksgiving. I generally do a East meets West theme but am trying to escape putting oyster sauce in everything this year. If you haven't tried it, its fab! My menu so far include the following:

Cocktail:
Pomegranate Mojito

Appetizer:
Artisan Cheeses, Salumi Salami, selection of picked vegetables, and country pate.

Sides:
Pumpkin lasagna with brown butter, carmalized onions and bechamel sauce with sage.
Creamed pearl onions with french beans
New pototoes with garlic and rosemary
Pancetta apple stuffing
Giblet gravy
Cranberry orange relish
Whole Wheat Rolls
Cornbreads

Main:
Turkey brined in with orange/lemon zest, honey and ginger
With a simple poultry seasoning butter rub.

Dessert:
Fresh Pumpkin pie with gingersnap and toasted pecans (I roast my own pumpkin, it tastes better I think)
Chocolate cake wtih chocolate mint ganache
Autumn Fruit tart

Wine:
Sokol Blosser Meditrina & Evolution No.10

Additionally, I think it is a nice gesture to give your guests some parting gifts so I am going to make cinnamon rolls with the whole wheat bread dough and put them in individual brown bags with my guests name on them. It makes them feel special!

#28 Kristi

Kristi
  • Moderator
  • 2,043 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NW Portland

Posted 15 November 2006 - 05:39 PM

I want an invitation to your house! Your entire menu sounds amazing, but you had me at the Pomegranate Mojito. Also, welcome to the board!

#29 GizmoCat

GizmoCat
  • Members
  • 729 posts
  • Location:NE Portland
  • Interests:Wine, Food, Music, Travel

Posted 15 November 2006 - 06:25 PM

With all of the Thanksgiving menu chat, a question came to mind. Everyone has a different time that they prefer to enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner. What time do you usually dine?

For me, guests arrive at 6PM and we usually sit down at the table around 7 or 7:30.

#30 RM

RM
  • Members
  • 589 posts

Posted 15 November 2006 - 08:38 PM




Wine
Tres Donne Arneis


Sorry to be a wine brat here, but Tre Donne Arneis is an absolute fraud. Try Vietti, Deltetto or Fontanabianca and I think you will get a lot more bang for your (varietal) buck. Even Ponzi makes a better Arneis than Tre Donne, and anyone who has heard me lecture about this grape knows just how bad I think Tre Donne is. :emoticon depicting me rolling over and peeing on myself (dog reference) as I admit that Ponzi is finally getting it right with this varietal:

Drink what you like, but any Small Vineyards wine gets my hackles up. Nothing personal towards you Gizmo. :P

MR

No offense taken, Mostly Running. May I ask why you are so adamant about your dislike of Tres Donne? Or maybe I should say Small Vineyards.

I'm hosting my wine group in March and my theme will be Arneis. It's one of the few "themes" we haven't done in the 8 years we've been a group. I had Gem Wine Cellar put together a list of all of the Arenis' that are in town, so I'll definately take your suggestions. It's been awhile since I have had Vietti, but I know that I always liked it. Also, Abona...are they still being sold around town? Can't remember. ;) Casa Bruno used to distribute their wine.


I'll just say that Abonna is still with Casa Bruno and is definitely part of the cast you should try. If I'm feeling like a good rant about Small Vineyards I'll PM you. Have fun with the tasting and let me know your favorites.

MR





I had some Marziano Abbona Arneis at a dinner last weekend and it was very nice. Had a fresh and light taste. Much better than the Ponzi and the Matteo Correggia Arneis I served at a tasting about a year ago.

#31 keittiomestari

keittiomestari
  • Members
  • 295 posts
  • Location:A little outside PDX
  • Interests:Life, food history, organic chemistry, wines, distilling, music

Posted 18 November 2006 - 11:13 AM

Since I have a hard time finding Turkey and only having 3 others to feed we are going a little different route. After all its just another Thursday really!

Finally found some inspiration for some of the stockpiled wines. I have 2 of each to sacrifice for the dinner.
Lots of food, but not such large portions so we get a good trasitions with the wines. In all though I figure the evening will be about 6 hours to complete as I have to periodically cook some items.

First of the starting coctail!

Lingonberry reduction and Prazdnichnaya Vintage Vodka 2002 shot.

Now that the palate will be cleansed!

Dom P 92
Elderberry Gravad Whitefish, Red and Green Pepper Gravad River Salmon, Spruce and Juniper Gravad Reindeer. These will be served with Blackbread cruotons.

Whitefish Roe, Baltic Herring Roe, Arctic Char Roe, Creme Fraiche, pickled red onion and rye blini

Herring and Potato casserole

Duck liver mousse with rose hip marmalade and fig "jus"

Goose leg confit with apricot and bacon

New wine:
Bodegas Lan Rioja Limited Edition 2003

Smoked salmon and blue cheese rullade

Smoked leg of lamb

Bresaola of Entrecote (much like air cured ham) Looking at it now from my window!

"Mains"
Red wine braised steer breast root veg and truffle terrine

New wine:Luis Jadot 93 Bienvenue Batard Montrachet

Veal Sausage with braised fennel, carrot, turnip and white grapes. (I froze some verjus for just such an occasion)

Roasted Monkfish with almond potato, asparagus puree and pike roe.

A little break!!!!

I have just one bottle to contribute on this day of 90 D'Yquem Sauternes

Pumpkin and black currant terrine with seabuckthorn and honey sorbet.

Again just one bottle, Taylors 77 vintage port
and I havent yet picked the cheeses yet, will do that wednesday after I get an idea of what the others seem to like. If thats not in order then we will do a flight of chocolates going through the %'s with coffee and port.

Alot of work, but alot of fun also. I do this kind of thing a couple times a year. Evenyone pitches in some money and off we go!
Kiippis!

#32 Amanda

Amanda
  • Moderator
  • 7,624 posts
  • Location:NE Portland
  • Interests:Eating, cooking, kayaking, canoeing, letterboxing

Posted 18 November 2006 - 11:22 AM

My folks are holding Thanksgiving, so John and I will be going over to Vancouver for my favorite holiday. Our contribution to the dinner will be a couple family-sized tarts from Little Pots & Pans that we plan to buy at the Hillsdale Farmers Market tomorrow.

GreenPapaya your menu sounds outstanding. Any chance you'd be willing to post your recipe for the pumpkin lasagne with carmelized onion and bechamel sauce? I imagine that has to be some kind of incredible!

Best regards,

Amanda

#33 GreenPapaya

GreenPapaya
  • Members
  • 12 posts

Posted 19 November 2006 - 12:56 PM

Hi Amanda,

Actually, I really don’t have a recipe but rather an adaptation from many recipes (including Giada De Laurentiis Butternut Squash Lasagna) and ingredients that I thought would make it taste that much better. With lasagna, you can be creative and add anything you like. Here is what I am planning on doing.

Fresh Lasagna (you can get this at Trader Joe’s for $1.99!)
1 (1 1/2 to 2-pound) pumpkin puree
Salt and freshly ground black pepper and nutmeg to taste and perhaps some brown sugar.
Caramelized onions
Brown Butter
Béchamel Sauce:
5 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus 2 tablespoons for the lasagna
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
4 cups whole milk at room temperature
Pinch freshly grated nutmeg
Sage to taste
Shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese


Layer the bottom of an 8x9 pan with béchamel sage sauce. Next, spread the pumpkin puree evenly over the noodles and drizzle with brown butter. Spread mozzarella cheese over next layer. Spread caramelized onions over noodles. Spread béchamel sauce entirely over noodles, than cover with mozzarella & Parmesan cheese.

Also, attached is the link for Giada’s recipe, I found the basil to be overpowering the butternut squash (which I substituted for pumpkin). The true star of this recipe is the pumpkin and it needs to be emphasized. The great thing about this recipe is that you can really make it your own, I hope this helps!

http://www.foodnetwo...tml?rsrc=search

Good Luck!
G-Papaya

#34 thakrza

thakrza
  • Members
  • 702 posts

Posted 19 November 2006 - 01:48 PM

I'm gonna get slaughtered on this board for this one, but screw it...

*A POPEYES CAJUN TURKEY (it is just us two and we gotta do all the sides ourselves...and I just have to see it for myself)

And now for the homemade goods:

*Creamed Collards (me) regular slow-cooked/hot vinegar collards for Hollis (the creamed ones are just cream added to the vinegar/spicy ones I make for him)

*Mashed potats and gravy (we'll use bacon grease for gravy, I guess)

*Cornbread dressing (if I am feeling crazy, I may put some oysters in my half of the casserole dish)

*Sweet Potato pie

*Cranberry sauce

#35 Amanda

Amanda
  • Moderator
  • 7,624 posts
  • Location:NE Portland
  • Interests:Eating, cooking, kayaking, canoeing, letterboxing

Posted 19 November 2006 - 04:17 PM

Thanks so much for posting your version of the recipe, GreenPapaya. I'm going to have to give it a shot. Maybe after Thanksgiving, though.

Best regards,

Amanda

#36 sweater

sweater
  • Members
  • 10 posts

Posted 19 November 2006 - 05:13 PM

funny i read this thread just before calling my parents to retrieve my
grandma's recipe for corn and oysters...its in a cream sauce (like the fannie farmer cookbook) with a browned dumpling on top...haven't had it since i
was a kid....i will post the recipe when i have it...i remember it being both disgusting and delicious...at the same time...

#37 Amanda

Amanda
  • Moderator
  • 7,624 posts
  • Location:NE Portland
  • Interests:Eating, cooking, kayaking, canoeing, letterboxing

Posted 22 November 2006 - 09:05 PM

HAPPY THANKSGIVING, EVERYONE!

May you all be grateful and feast. Gobble, gobble!

Best regards,

Amanda

#38 Calabrese

Calabrese

    Desaparecido

  • Banned
  • 5,970 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gone

Posted 23 November 2006 - 08:55 PM

We are back from our meal. I was really happy to have 3 kinds of turkey including a heritage bird that had been cooked in a smoker. We also had 3 kinds of homemade cranberry sauce (including a chutney version). Jill-O made the best cranberry sauce. The creamed onions were in fact creamed leaks this year. There were two kinds of stuffing/dressing, grean salad, green beans with almonds, root veggies, mashed potetoes, gravy, while jello mold (something of Irish lineage), green salad, and gingered carrots. My deviled oysters turned out well. There was hubbard squash pie with whipped cream, chocolate covered carmel bars, a fruity sort of bread pudding. And there was a massive collection of wine as most sets of guests come with at least two bottles. I got a flute of prosecco and then settled in for an evening of Oregon reds from pinot noir to tempernillo. I am sure I left food items out but it was a very satisfying meal and we played a tame version of 2 truths and a lie.

#39 ZenBoy

ZenBoy
  • Members
  • 535 posts
  • Location:Portland East

Posted 24 November 2006 - 03:10 PM

Well, it was just two of us, my whole family is in a different state.

Tri tip roast with garlic and ginger rub, which came out way, way too close to medium well for me.
Cornbread dressing.
Mushroom and onion brown gravy (for going on the dressing and the roast), which was my first try at a brown gravy and it came out great.
Potato and leek soup with bacon drippings, which was quite nice, though next time I'll do it without the bacon.
A respectable number of beers (Bridgeport Supris, which I like more each time I try it, and New Belgium Blue Paddle Pilsner, which is OK, but not exactly my cuppa)

And for dessert...

Nothin'. Too full.

Okay, I lied, a Popsicle brand Diet A&W root beer popsicle.

#40 LadyConcierge

LadyConcierge

    Food is good

  • Members
  • 1,534 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:McMinnville

Posted 24 November 2006 - 06:40 PM

Brian and I made mashed potatoes for 25 people. One plain batch with just butter and milk for the little kids, and the "adult" version with lots of garlic and rosemary and left the skins on. We went to my grandmother's house, where everything is pretty traditional. We had roast turkey (organic, free range from New Seasons), our mashed pots, giblet gravy, stuffing, green beans with stewed tomatoes and parm crisps, asian coleslaw, jello salad, fruit salad, and butterflake rolls. For dessert there were 2 pumpkin pies, 2 apple, 2 cherry, some mini pecan pies, lemon bars, and raspberry bars. Brian and I brought our own Abacela Red Table wine and tried not to share since everyone else was drinking Columbia Crest Merlot. :w00t:
It was a good Thanksgiving!

GizmoCat: I was going to ask the same question. Both sides of my family does Thanksgiving dinner in the early afternoon, 2 or 3ish. Brian, though, thought that was weird cause his family (in Florida) eats at 6 or 7.