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Poll: Stuffing: in or out? (47 member(s) have cast votes)

Do you actually stuff your bird or cook the dressing in a separate dish?

  1. Of course, I stuff the bird! It's the way my mamma did it! (3 votes [6.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.38%

  2. Out of the bird! Stuffing is unsanitary and makes the dressing too moist. (26 votes [55.32%])

    Percentage of vote: 55.32%

  3. In and out...give the people a choice! (18 votes [38.30%])

    Percentage of vote: 38.30%

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#1 MaBell

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Posted 07 November 2006 - 09:28 AM

For those of you who are cooking Thanksgiving dinner this year, what's on the menu? I would love to hear what will be on peoples tables this holiday!

My sister and I are in the process of planning our Thanksgiving menu and while we have several family favorites, we're always looking for inspiration in both the menu and for wine reccomendations.

We typically have around 15 people at our Thanksgiving so having too much food is never a concern. And I try to pick a few wines that can satisfy a large group of people. I tried the Desert Wind Ruah red blend a few weeks ago and thought that might work nicely. Any other suggestions in the wine arena?

On the menu so far:

Turkey basted in red wine and citrus
Chestnut dressing (in the bird - forget all those health warnings)
Potato gnocchi (a family tradition)
Brussels sprouts
Pumpkin custard with candied walnuts
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#2 Calabrese

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Posted 07 November 2006 - 12:20 PM

I have been having Thanksgiving with a group of friends for over 25 years. We all bring things but I can take some stabs at what will be on the menu...

Free range turkey grilled over mesquite (this is our tradition) - sometimes someone brings another turkey cooked differently

mashed potatoes
several kinds of gravy
several kinds of stuffing including a spicey one with sausage
several homemade cranberry condiments including one with curry
if the Seattle contingency comes down - creamed onions
deviled oysters with shallots, sherry and shitake mushrooms (my contribution)
dinner rolls
crudite platter
salted nuts
various veggies including squash and green beans
homemade hubbard squash pie and whipped cream
various assortment of other desserts
red wines (probably some noveaus and pinots and cabs and ??? )
sparkling wines (something tells me there will be prosecco)
the most different kind of egg nog you have ever experienced (with hard liquor to spike it)
non-alcoholic drinks for kids
coffee, cream, sugar

Based on past experiences, that's my best guess for now.....

#3 Kristi

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Posted 07 November 2006 - 12:42 PM

Here's our menu:

Appetizer - a butternut squash open faced tart, thanks to Krispenn
Turkey with stuffing - it has evolved over the years but these days we brine it first and then roast it covered with cheese cloth, and the stuffing is very simple with bread crumbs, walnuts, garlic, celery, sage, and butter
Mashed potatoes - nothing fancy, just your standard potatoes with butter and milk
Gravy - every year it is a fight as to whether or not the giblets will be added to the gravy so it may or may not be chunky
Cranberry sauce - homemade and very simple
Green bean casserole - made from scratch (meaning no Cambell's soup) and even the onion rings on top are homemade
Sweet potato souffle
Brown sugar rolls
Cheesecake and pumpkin pie for dessert
Lots of wine - we'll probably have a little Prosecco and then red wine, I'll probably head to the Wine Cellar and let them recommend something

Our menu changes very little from one year to the next and we are a very traditional family, as you can tell, so we don't do anything very fancy. I can't wait for Turkey Day!

#4 Cat Lancaster

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Posted 07 November 2006 - 01:21 PM

Iím doing T-Day dinner on Friday as a girlfriend is flying in from Germany for the holiday and doesnít arrive until late Thursday night. Iím going to cook the majority of the dinner, but the guests are going to be two Germans and four Romanians so they are each going to be making something that is a comfort food for them from back home.

I think that T-Day is the easiest meal to make as far as cooking is concerned; the only trick I find is in the timing. And since essentially all of it can be eaten at room temperature, really itís just making sure that nothing gets too cold. And I try to do as much of it in advance as possible, so that come turkey day my biggest concern is making sure that my wine glass is always full ;-)

Butternut/Pumpkin/Whatever kind of squash is available at Uncle Paulís the weekend before, as that is when Iím going to be making this soup

I ordered a 12 pound heritage turkey from Pastaworks that I will roast

I been throwing bread into the freezer for the last month or so, that I will use to make the stuffing. I make a fairly simple stuffing Ė bread, onions, celery, currents, sage, chicken stock, etc. Ė but I think it has good flavor from all the different kinds of bread that I use

Homemade cranberry sauce with clementines and some kind of liquor for extra umph

Brussels Sprouts with pearl onions & bacon

Mashed yams/sweet potatoes with lots of butter and heavy cream

Pumpkin & Pecan pies

Plus whatever sides the guests bring.

Cheers!

Cat
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"I'm not a picky eater, but I'm picky about what I eat." ~ Me

#5 westslope97225

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 05:22 PM

I have been having Thanksgiving with a group of friends for over 25 years. Free range turkey grilled over mesquite (this is our tradition)


Would you care to share your recipe and the steps of how you grill your brid??

I want to do something different this year .. I'm thinking about a deep fried bird, but, I've seen another post about your, "mesquite grilled turkey".

#6 GizmoCat

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 09:14 PM

Not being much of a turkey fan, I am opting for beef this year:

Welcome
Baked Brie with Nuts

Wine
LaFitte Rose'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Amuse-Bouche
Baby Portabella Mushrooms Stuffed
with Cream Cheese and Bay Shrimp
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appetizer
Crab Martini's

Wine
Tres Donne Arneis
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Soup
Butternut Squash Bisque
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salad
Mixed Baby Greens with Bleu Cheese,
Dried Cranberries and Hazlenuts
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intermezzo
Lemon Sorbet
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Entree
Prime Rib
Yorkshire Pudding
Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Roasted Brussles Sprouts
Pumpkin Rolls
Yams with Marshmallows (these are a request no matter what the menu)

Wine
Norton Privada
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dessert
Pumpkin Pie

#7 Calabrese

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 10:49 PM

Would you care to share your recipe and the steps of how you grill your brid??

I want to do something different this year .. I'm thinking about a deep fried bird, but, I've seen another post about your, "mesquite grilled turkey".


I have never grilled / bbqed the turkey over mesquite. However, I am having dinner Sat. night with one of the grill masters. I'll try to remember to ask him about it and get back to you after that. It's really good. We had a brined bird oven roasted one year along iwith mesquite bird. I preferred mesquite bird. Free range is important too. You can order at New Seasons among other places.

#8 MaBell

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 09:56 PM

I love the idea of oysters! I am going to start looking at the best ways to incorporate them into our menu.
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#9 Calabrese

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 11:51 PM

I love the idea of oysters! I am going to start looking at the best ways to incorporate them into our menu.


Oyster stuffing is fairly traditional in New England. Recipes abound here and there.

#10 Cat Lancaster

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 09:15 AM


I love the idea of oysters! I am going to start looking at the best ways to incorporate them into our menu.


Oyster stuffing is fairly traditional in New England. Recipes abound here and there.


I think oyster stuffing is absolutely delicious, although I think it *looks* disgusting!

Cat
"travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness" ~ Mark Twain

"I'm not a picky eater, but I'm picky about what I eat." ~ Me

#11 Jill-O

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 10:46 AM

I adore Calabrese's deviled oysters - they rock (and so do you, hon! ;o) We go to the coast to Bay City (Pacific, right on 101/Tillamook Bay) and get a bunch of "cuts" right before T-day so she can make it with really fresh oysters. mmm...deviled oysters...
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#12 ducky

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 01:41 PM

Pizza, or maybe fondue. No, really! My birthday falls that week and when it falls on turkey day, I get whatever I want. My sis is going to the in-laws this year so we're talking party on wednesday. Leftovers the next day for my house. Cold pepperoni, an icy cold coke, boxers and a movie are sounding good to me. I've been baking like crazy the last couple months so a day of rest sounds good. Enjoy your oysters! :lol:
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#13 Guest_MostlyRunning_*

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 02:52 PM

Wine
Tres Donne Arneis


Sorry to be a wine brat here, but Tre Donne Arneis is an absolute fraud. Try Vietti, Deltetto or Fontanabianca and I think you will get a lot more bang for your (varietal) buck. Even Ponzi makes a better Arneis than Tre Donne, and anyone who has heard me lecture about this grape knows just how bad I think Tre Donne is. :emoticon depicting me rolling over and peeing on myself (dog reference) as I admit that Ponzi is finally getting it right with this varietal:

Drink what you like, but any Small Vineyards wine gets my hackles up. Nothing personal towards you Gizmo. :unsure:

MR

#14 MaBell

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 03:02 PM


I love the idea of oysters! I am going to start looking at the best ways to incorporate them into our menu.


Oyster stuffing is fairly traditional in New England. Recipes abound here and there.


My family would riot if I didn't make chestnut stuffing so I'll need to find another way to introduce oysters into the menu. Maybe I can convince Pat to do some oysters on the grill that day for an appetizer.
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#15 Calabrese

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 04:20 PM

I make a variation of the Deviled Oysters recipe found in the 1965 version of The Fannie Farmer Cookbook . Instead of fresh mushroom caps, I use dried shitakes that have been thoroughly reconstitued in cooking sherry. Instead of the recipe ratio of cream and milk, I just use half and half. I omit the parsley. And I add more sherry to the cooking liquid. I also don't follow any of the seasonings portions to the recipe but go on my taste. It's a lovely dish. You can make individually in ramekins or in a casserole.

#16 GizmoCat

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 04:37 PM


Wine
Tres Donne Arneis


Sorry to be a wine brat here, but Tre Donne Arneis is an absolute fraud. Try Vietti, Deltetto or Fontanabianca and I think you will get a lot more bang for your (varietal) buck. Even Ponzi makes a better Arneis than Tre Donne, and anyone who has heard me lecture about this grape knows just how bad I think Tre Donne is. :emoticon depicting me rolling over and peeing on myself (dog reference) as I admit that Ponzi is finally getting it right with this varietal:

Drink what you like, but any Small Vineyards wine gets my hackles up. Nothing personal towards you Gizmo. ;)

MR

No offense taken, Mostly Running. May I ask why you are so adamant about your dislike of Tres Donne? Or maybe I should say Small Vineyards.

I'm hosting my wine group in March and my theme will be Arneis. It's one of the few "themes" we haven't done in the 8 years we've been a group. I had Gem Wine Cellar put together a list of all of the Arenis' that are in town, so I'll definately take your suggestions. It's been awhile since I have had Vietti, but I know that I always liked it. Also, Abona...are they still being sold around town? Can't remember. :unsure: Casa Bruno used to distribute their wine.

#17 Guest_MostlyRunning_*

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 05:53 PM



Wine
Tres Donne Arneis


Sorry to be a wine brat here, but Tre Donne Arneis is an absolute fraud. Try Vietti, Deltetto or Fontanabianca and I think you will get a lot more bang for your (varietal) buck. Even Ponzi makes a better Arneis than Tre Donne, and anyone who has heard me lecture about this grape knows just how bad I think Tre Donne is. :emoticon depicting me rolling over and peeing on myself (dog reference) as I admit that Ponzi is finally getting it right with this varietal:

Drink what you like, but any Small Vineyards wine gets my hackles up. Nothing personal towards you Gizmo. ;)

MR

No offense taken, Mostly Running. May I ask why you are so adamant about your dislike of Tres Donne? Or maybe I should say Small Vineyards.

I'm hosting my wine group in March and my theme will be Arneis. It's one of the few "themes" we haven't done in the 8 years we've been a group. I had Gem Wine Cellar put together a list of all of the Arenis' that are in town, so I'll definately take your suggestions. It's been awhile since I have had Vietti, but I know that I always liked it. Also, Abona...are they still being sold around town? Can't remember. :unsure: Casa Bruno used to distribute their wine.


I'll just say that Abonna is still with Casa Bruno and is definitely part of the cast you should try. If I'm feeling like a good rant about Small Vineyards I'll PM you. Have fun with the tasting and let me know your favorites.

MR

#18 unclepauly

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 08:38 PM

pretty excited, this is the first thanksgiving i'm hosting...

we're doing:

pumpkin and duck confit dumplings (i made duck confit for the first time last weekend and its sitting in my fridge in the fat right now)

curried butternut squash and apple soup

turkey (bringing a safeway frozen turkey)

sausage and herb stuffing - ive never made sausage from scratch...think i'm gonna try to do it in the bird...

garlic mash

lots of beer and alcohol

creamed spinach (trying to recreate my favorite boston market recipe)

apple pie from grand central bakery

rosemary dinner rolls also from grand central

#19 tejon

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 11:00 PM

For Thanksgiving Day, I'm officially making my Grandmother's rolls. Unofficially, I'm also making some Cranberry Jezebel Sauce (love the kick of horseradish). First T-day that I haven't hosted in about 10 years, and this one's a potluck so there's not a lot to make. The family members hosting aren't the best cooks, so I'm going for the company and not expecting a whole lot from the food.

I am planning on our own, smaller spread the day after Thanksgiving so there will be proper (and good tasting!) leftovers. Doing the basics - roast turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, gravy, green beans with walnuts and nutmeg. I know I'm going to miss having a bunch of people to cook for on my own, but things change.
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#20 pdxnewbie

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 11:45 PM

Our first Thanksgiving alone ( kids and family far away) so ours will be a tiny turkey, roasted with Southern Grandmas stuffing ( corn bread etc)..But, you know how there is always more stuffing than room in the bird? I was fooling around with bread puddings recently and made a Savory Bread Pudding, so I will make a bread pudding with the stuffing ..
Curried carrot soup
Mashed potatoes
Some sort of veggies
and Apple Pie.
How ordinary yet comforting B)