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#1 AngryRhino

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 01:44 PM

*disclaimer: I am personal friends with the bfast cook

I was invited to the soft opening of Broders for breakfast this weekend. A new place occupying the old Henry's Cafe on SE Clinton. Opened by the same people that own Savoy Bistro and Tavern next door, Broders has an emphasis on Scandanavian foods. They have an interesting and fun menu, wish I would have snagged one to post here, but since it was a soft opening it may very well have some changes over the next few weeks.

My GF and our other friend ordered the baked eggs, cooked/served in small square cast iron skillet. One with side of bacon, one with side of house cured ham, both with hash browns. For whatever personal reason, I disdain eggs in the breakfast format, so I didn't try them, but both looked fantastic, and were cooked perfectly. I enjoyed the bacon and the ham, although the GF didn't think the ham was smoky enough. I don't recall if it was smoked or just cured on the menu. Hash browns were tasty, although a bit too greasy for my taste, I think, even if I had the hangover of the century.

I ordered the bfast sandwich - house ham, gruyere and marjoram cream on the side. Served on sourdough, nicely toasted. Side of hash browns. The marjoram cream was something I've never had before but was quite pleased when dipping my sandwich in. It made me think of a somewhat deconstructed monte christo for lack of a better term.

They also serve aebleskivers, a danish pancake that resembles a donut hole in shape only. Didn't try these, but they seemed to be quite a popular item. We figured we would return and try those next weekend.

Not having the menu in front of me, I can't recall the entire list of other offerings. They did have some lunch items listed, with the GF expressing excitement about the 5 salad sampler.

As far as I know, they do plan to start dinner service in the near future. Hopefully I can return this weekend and try out more of the menu and post it.

Total bill was $34 for our 3 plates and 2 cups of Stumptown (@ $3/cup.) A little pricey overall, but I really had fun with this place. Service was great!

Broders
2508 SE Clinton St
Portland, OR
97202-1239

#2 StMaximo

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 05:09 PM

Could you post the hours please?

Sounds like a good place to try.

Any pickled herring? Gravlax?

What can I say, I may have ravaged or pillaged some Anglos in another life.

#3 AngryRhino

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Posted 10 July 2007 - 03:13 PM

Grand Opening will be Monday, July 16th - they will be closed all this week.

Once open, hours should be:
M-F 8am-3pm
Sat-Sun 9am to 3pm

I can't comment on the pickled herring or gravlax because I just can't remember for sure! Last weekend was, what, like 4 days ago or something? My bass player brain doesn't retain that sort of info for very long. :blush:
Sorry!

#4 Guest_MostlyRunning_*

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Posted 10 July 2007 - 03:47 PM

I'm going to have to flip Peter Bro some shit for opening a place called "broders." I'm looking forward to trying it.

MR

#5 scouty

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 09:06 AM

went to Broder's this weekend. there is nothing familiar ( I'm not swedish). I had a scramble which should be called a bake, nice presentation,served on a wood plank, walnut bread was good but not toasted and potatoes are served on a paper lining which makes using ketchup awkward. it was good, but I'll probaly not be a regular.

#6 gustoeater

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 10:24 AM

From the 09/07 A& E: Roger Porter on Broder (does that rhyme?)

When you devour the prodigious Scandinavian breakfast at Broder, you feel an obligation to do something equally heroic, like play Leif Eriksson and discover a country, or at the least go whaling. The Swedish Breakfast Bord (a wooden serving plate) of salami, smoked trout, grapefruit, granola, yogurt, hard cheese and homemade lingonberry jam certainly offer ample fortification for hearty deeds.

Portland is a breakfast kind of town, but Portlanders haven't seen anything quite like Broder. We are familiar with football-size three-egg omelets, but not a handcrafted white ash gravlax bord presenting house-cured smoked fish nestled on Swedish brown bread and laced with pickled red onions and horseradish cream. Or a similar platter with pickled herring as the headlining fish. We know about pancakes in many national guises, but probably not Danish aebleskivers, 2-inch-diameter puffs of airy batter cooked in a tiny skillet and brought to the table with lemon curd, maple syrup or jam, for your choice of tart or sweet sensations. We typically tuck into eggs sunny side up, but not the baked version that's served here. These eggs are gently cracked into a bit of cream pooled in a square cast-iron skillet and baked, served either alone, with salmon or mushrooms, or draped over a mountainous pile of "Swedish hash": sauteed cubed potatoes, peppers, ham and roast beef.

You won't be needing lunch.

Lingonberries are a circumpolar fruit, meaning they grow in dense mats on the tundra, moors, heath barrens and bogs of northern climes. The herring at Broder has the salt of the Baltic, the brown bread the hardiness of Scandinavian fisherfolk. Who masterminded this panoply of clean, fresh tastes? The owner is Peter Bro, whose Midwestern father was Swedish and whose name, Swedish for bridge, translates easily to "brother" and hence "Broder" in the native tongue. The chef is Alton Garcia, who cultivated his love for sharp and forward flavors at The Square Peg and Navarre. Both men have a stake in the bistro next door, Savoy, Broder's "brother" spot.

Broder is a sun-bathed, long, narrow room, and in addition to the tables, there's a row of construction-hardhat-yellow barstools for counter seating. The textures are bright and inviting: dark wood, white tiles, stainless steel.

As you leave, get a slice of cherry spice cake to go -- it's a dream sweet. And ask if Broder is renting harpoons for the day.

Broder, 2508 S.E. Clinton St., 503-736-3333. Open Tuesday-Sunday for breakfast and lunch.

#7 ExtraMSG

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 02:45 AM

Don't know when they started, but Broder is open for dinner now. Went the other night. This place deserves your business.

1) A good value: You get a three course meal with four dishes for like $24. You get a fish starter, two other starters, and a main.

2) Everything we had, minus the desserts, was really well put together with simple, but nicely balanced flavors.

3) It's unique. There's nothing like it in Portland, except some overlap on items like gravlax with us.

I lost my copy of the menu, but we tried these and probably some more:

* meatballs with lingonberry
* cheese plate
* lentils with beets
* pickle plate
* venison with braised cabbage and new potatoes
* smoked black cod (ie, sable)
* cured beef
* slaw

The cured beef had an ultra tender texture, almost like butter -- really. The lentils were terrific, perfectly cooked, and balanced with the pickled beets. The venison was delicious, with a really nice complimentary slightly sweet sauce, the slightly bitter but buttery cabbage and the potatoes. The meatballs were a little bland without salt, but very pleasant with it and the lingonberries weren't overly sweet and didn't overpower the delicately flavored meat. All good. Most of the small plates were $5 each. Reasonable. Most of the entrees were about $16, I think. I think the $24 deal is a perfect amount of food, probably a little too much for some individuals.

Only downside, like I said above, was the desserts. First, they're overpriced at $6. I got bread pudding which was literally a SLICE of bread pudding, laid on its side on a plate with a dollop of cream. A big cookie from a coffee shop is larger. And it just wasn't especially good. Kind of blah. Maybe nice for an accompaniment to coffee at $2 or $3, but not when looking forward to bread pudding for a dessert. We also got a chocolate cake that was dense and dry and small.

I'd definitely go back, but I'd probably skip out on dessert unless they change them up. Overall a very good experience. I'm glad they're doing dinner since I can get away for dinner and I'm not much of a breakfast person anyway.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#8 Twitch

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 04:28 AM

was the sable cured with sugar or just smoked ala podnahs?

#9 ExtraMSG

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 03:35 PM

Dunno

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#10 Will

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 03:21 PM

Thanks for the report. It's in my neighborhood and I love me some good values.

#11 Will

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 11:38 AM

We made it to Broder's for dinner last night, and had a very good meal. The cured and smoked fishes were all wonderful (pickled herring fans should try the herring & mustard sauce). I really like the meatballs with lingonberry, the flavors blended well. Braised leeks & cabbage had a soft texture, and were delicious. The only downside was a $5 plate of salami that showed up as 9 thin slices spread out on a plate. Maybe a salami aficionado would recognize something spectacular about the dish, or the type of salami used, but for me... it was just 9 thin slices of salami for $5.

All four of us had the $24 Smorgasbord (choose your own 4 dishes), and we all left very happy and stuffed. I think it's one of the best values for a $24 meal I've had in Portland, and we'll be back to choose from the dozens of other dishes. Peter, the owner, came over and talked with us for a few minutes afterward, he's very nice.

#12 LionRock

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 11:51 AM

I've had the Sunday Smorgasbord a couple of times, and agree that it's a good deal and (from what I can tell) pretty unique in this town. This was a couple of months ago, so I can't remember the exact details too well (was meaning to post about it, but just never got round to it - sorry) but I liked pretty much everything we had. I do agree that the desserts are rather overpriced for what you get. Definitely need to go back soon.

#13 sfspanky

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 10:07 AM

I have been to Broder twice this week - once for lunch and this morning for breakfast. For lunch I had the Swedish meatball sandwich, with split pea and ham soup ($7) and this morning I had the Swedish pancakes with lingonberry jam, lemon curd and a side of bacon ($10). I found both meals excellent, perfect amount of food and an extreme value for the quality. Even though the menu for breakfast & lunch (8am-2pm) is small and focused, I had a hard time deciding what to get. Very much looking forward to returning and trying the Lamb Burger for lunch as well as a savory dish on my next breakfast visit.
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#14 Twitch

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 01:27 PM

Was more interested in my partner than the food, but:

Gravlax came with marinated onions which I did not try, but the fish itself was delicious. Buttery cuts, not too fishy, didn't taste like its own cure. It came with the standard mustard dill sauce that was a little more mild and sweet than I'm used to (but y'all know how I feel about sweet foods). Served with rye toasts.

Meatballs: also delicious, though seasoned differently than others I've had - less nutmeg and allspice than others. They seemed to be mostly beef with a bit of lamb. Came four to a plate with lingonberry jam that I did not try. I guess this was closer to meat loaf than most meatballs I've had, but I still liked them a lot.

Pickle plate: I didn't have the beets or the carrots, but the fennel was the highlight. They also had a pickled somewhat hot red pepper that was good. Cukes were fine.

Braised greens: a problem I had with the savoy reappears, and will again later in this report. They were super over buttered. I like butter a lot. Its a great flavoring agent. Butter overpowered all other flavors in this dish, just like it did for my order of veg at the Savoy a few weeks back. It kind of ruins the flavor and the texture. They seemed to be a mix of kale, cabbage and collards.

Monkfish: steamed in aquavit and pan roasted. This wasn't the freshest piece of fish, but it wasn't offensively pungent. I think it would be better with a good marinade, although I'm not sure how that'd affect the texture of the fish. There were very light herbs, but nothing too flavorful. It was a generous portion served on top a very buttery and rich pilaf that, again, overpowered its constituent parts with butter flavor.

Double Mountain Kolsch is the only tap, and it's a good choice for the food. I really like the space, especially since it has one row of tables instead of the uncomfortable middle row like the Savoy has. I felt overall it was a decent value, especially considering the volume of food. Bonus points for The Streets and Monaco on the stereo in the same service.

#15 ExtraMSG

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Posted 29 February 2008 - 10:54 PM

One of the most under-rated or at least under-visited places for dinner in town from my experience. Was going to go to Vindalho tonight, but they looked full at 8:30pm so we went to Broder, my wife's first visit. Very tasty meal. I had the smorgasboard with king crab salad, lentils & beets, mashed turnips & parsnips, and the rock cod with crab gratin. Delicious, all of it. Wife had three mid courses: deviled eggs, cheese tart, and meatballs with lingonberries. She enjoyed everything. About $40 for the two of our meals.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#16 Angelhair

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 07:12 AM

One of the most under-rated or at least under-visited places for dinner in town from my experience. Was going to go to Vindalho tonight, but they looked full at 8:30pm so we went to Broder, my wife's first visit. Very tasty meal. I had the smorgasboard with king crab salad, lentils & beets, mashed turnips & parsnips, and the rock cod with crab gratin. Delicious, all of it. Wife had three mid courses: deviled eggs, cheese tart, and meatballs with lingonberries. She enjoyed everything. About $40 for the two of our meals.


That's high praise. I have been relectant to check it out...thinking of the cuisine as no more than a gimmick. But it sounds like the food is wonderful.

#17 supersly

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 10:42 AM

Is it a romantic, quiet kind of place? Or is it a place we could go with our newborn? (Assuming she's asleep in her car seat).

#18 keittiomestari

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 11:26 AM

That's high praise. I have been relectant to check it out...thinking of the cuisine as no more than a gimmick. But it sounds like the food is wonderful.

Can I ask why one would assume that the cuisine would be a gimmick?
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#19 Angelhair

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 12:16 PM



That's high praise. I have been relectant to check it out...thinking of the cuisine as no more than a gimmick. But it sounds like the food is wonderful.

Can I ask why one would assume that the cuisine would be a gimmick?


My use of the word 'gimmick' was not specific to Broder (having not been there), nor do I have any disdain for Scandanavian cuisine. I only meant that I assumed (incorrectly, it seems) that Broder was presenting something inauthentic along the lines of Ikea.

#20 sfspanky

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 12:21 PM

Is it a romantic, quiet kind of place? Or is it a place we could go with our newborn? (Assuming she's asleep in her car seat).


It is family friendly.
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