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Informal Group Rules


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#1 Angelhair

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 06:34 AM

Every once in a while, I think it's a good idea for us to reiterate some of the 'rules' of our eating events. Here's what I always try to do when I eat out with our group.

-->Bring cash: I try to estimate how much it will be and bring cash. Serving a big group of people is hard enough. To hand a server a fist-ful of credit cards at the end of the night just makes their job harder. While I know many places will gladly split checks on seperate cards, I try to make a server's job easier.

-->Confirm: When the on-line query of 'who's coming' arises, I always reconfirm. It makes the 'organizer's' life easier.

-->Show up: If it's an occassion where a reservation has been made, I always show up if I say I am coming. Cancelling, even a day in advance, is better than not showing up at all. I have heard horror stories of the rest of a group having to bear the burden of a few missing diners (Cat told a horrific one last night).

-->Be prepared to share: Sometimes we order things individually and sometimes we eat family style. This group is about tasting. And I know no matter how we order, I will reach a fork over into someone else's place and say, 'lemme try that'! If things are served family stlye, please be considerate of others at the table and make sure that there is enough for everyone before you pork down seconds!

-->Keep track of your drinks: Usually we evenly divide the food bill, and then each individual pays for their own drinks. When ordering, I make a mental note of how much that glass of wine is and keep track of how many I've have had...it makes it easier when the check comes.

-->Allow enough time: Serving a big group takes time. By the time things are ordered and served, meals can stretch on for a couple of hours (or more). Sometimes things go quickly, but more often than not, it's usually a couple of hours. Be prepared.


Nothing is set in stone here. It's just what I have picked up over the years in going out with these folks. These are just little things that make dining out in a big group easier for everyone.

#2 Jamesongrrl

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 09:52 AM

Thanks for posting Angelhair!

These are all very good points and ensure a good time is had by all!
(Organizers, attendee's and restaurants alike.)

:)
Jamesongrrl
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#3 Amanda

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 09:58 AM

This is a wonderful set of guidelines. I still think that the organizer has the perogative of asking for a deposit on major food events, if they so choose, or if that is uncomfortable, just make sure everything is reconfirmed by the day before. If someone doesn't reconfirm within 24 hours prior to the event or just stays silent, they should be PM'd or it should posted that they are no longer considered an attendee of the event.

This might seem a bit harsh, but with the abundance of the "flake factor" for events recently, it only seems fitting. Just my opinion.

Best regards,

Amanda

#4 Kristi

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 10:20 AM

This is a wonderful set of guidelines. I still think that the organizer has the perogative of asking for a deposit on major food events, if they so choose, or if that is uncomfortable, just make sure everything is reconfirmed by the day before. If someone doesn't reconfirm within 24 hours prior to the event or just stays silent, they should be PM'd or it should posted that they are no longer considered an attendee of the event.

This might seem a bit harsh, but with the abundance of the "flake factor" for events recently, it only seems fitting. Just my opinion.

Best regards,

Amanda


Amanda,
I like the idea of reconfirming for an event 24 hours in advance. A post could be put up a couple of days before the event confirming the details and asking everyone to respond that they are coming, if someone doesn't respond by 24 hours before they event they are off the list. I don't think that is harsh at all, I think it is a very good idea especially sicne our group has grown so much.

#5 Angelhair

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 10:23 AM

When calling to make reservations, it might be a good idea for who-ever is organizing to ask about the restaurant's cancellation policy. Some places are cool, but you don't want to be caught with your pants down.

#6 Calabrese

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 04:58 PM

I kind of don't like the 24 hour reconfirm rule as it places a bit more of a burden on the organizer. It seems to me that personal responsiblity dictates that if you sign-up for an event, you are responsible to notify the organizer if your plans need to change for some reason.

I do think that deposits may need to be considered if the restaurant involved has monetary penalties for reservation slippages.