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Do you check the health inspection report and score of restaurants?

whats a bad score to you?

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#1 WAfoodie

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 02:21 PM

I usually remember to check after I've eaten at a restaurant that resulted in subsequent illness, and not before, especially if it is new. I do have a bias that high-end restaurants and more expensive restaurants should have nearly perfect scores. If a high-end restaurant has continual negative scores then they are off my list. A score of 15-25 demerits on a 100-point scale (depending on the county database), would make me hesitate. Other qualitative signs of off-my-list reasons are rancid oil use, food service employee drinking from a customer's leftover drink glass also come to mind.



#2 pwillen1

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 06:00 AM

never.


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#3 crepeguy

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 07:36 AM

Where would you check?

 

In Multnomah County, they changed the server/system. Most of the records are gone. There are NO records for food carts. Most of what they DO check during ins[pections is BS. I've seen kitchen/carts in town that would never pass muster in other jurisdictions. I think it's a total farce. 



#4 WAfoodie

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 04:45 PM

Where would you check?

 

In Multnomah County, they changed the server/system. Most of the records are gone. There are NO records for food carts. Most of what they DO check during ins[pections is BS. I've seen kitchen/carts in town that would never pass muster in other jurisdictions. I think it's a total farce. 

You're right. It's not a perfect system. And Multnomah did change their system when I last checked.

Still, if one receives a perfect or near perfect score, like yourself, that's a good thing, no?



#5 crepeguy

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 06:07 PM


Where would you check?

 

In Multnomah County, they changed the server/system. Most of the records are gone. There are NO records for food carts. Most of what they DO check during ins[pections is BS. I've seen kitchen/carts in town that would never pass muster in other jurisdictions. I think it's a total farce. 

You're right. It's not a perfect system. And Multnomah did change their system when I last checked.

Still, if one receives a perfect or near perfect score, like yourself, that's a good thing, no?

 

It's a great thing, however, I cant find my latest scores on their new server. They're extremely disorganized.

 

I studied reports from locations I was interested in to see what each inspector looked for and what their singular pet peeves were. My take was that there's no clear, discernable uniformity, but I guess that's understandable for a city this size. 



#6 StMaximo

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 08:43 PM

I remember the days when they posted the grade on the window. I worked in a small diner in Washington County during that era. I would come in after school and help clean up after lunch, help through dinner and then do the evening cleanup. I thought I did a decent job of things, but the place was a bit funky and there were things that just really didn't get that clean based on what I know now. One day the health inspector came through and dinged us on a few small things and then pronounced it "the cleanest restaurant in the county". I've had a fairly realistic expectation of what goes on in restaurants as a result of that and some other experiences. Human beings are tougher than we give them credit for and most of us with a healthy immune system can overcome what most restaurants might reasonably expose us to.

 

Most places make the effort to do things right and provide decent sanitation. The inspectors typically check for proper strength sanitizing solution (bleach water). Proper temperature of the dishwasher to assure sanitation and and proper storage of and temperature of foods in the refrigerator or hot boxes. You can download a food handler's book on most county health websites. It does a good job of describing what the jobs of a food handler should be doing and will give you a good idea of the things an inspector might look for. 

 

I've wondered about food cart hygiene, but apparently they must be doing something right, because I haven't heard of any big outbreaks of illness connected to them. 

 

It seems that many of the outbreaks connected to food service are related to employees that are sick passing it on. Food carts usually don't have a lot of employees and perhaps they are less likely to have the type of employee that would pass along illness. 

 

Sometimes things just happen even to the best of places. I think the health inspections do more to keep things on the right track than really set the bar very high.

 

My worst restaurant kitchen experience was about twenty years ago when a friend took over a space in downtown Portland. We went in the day after the previous tenant vacated the spot. We pulled out the stoves and grill and found a rat embalmed in grease and cooking detritus behind where the stoves had been.  It was disgusting, but I'd never heard of anyone getting sick in it's previous incarnation.