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Banh Cuon Tanh Dinh


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#1 ExtraMSG

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 08:08 PM

I really love Banh Cuon Tanh Dinh. (At Fubonn to the right of the doors, the other side from Malay Satay Hut.) I think it's one of the top under-appreciated Portland restaurants right now. So I thought I'd give it its own thread. I've been there several times now and each was excellent. I took my wife there tonight for the first time and she loved it as well.

They were out of the banh cuon nanh thit, the rice paper "burritos" for which they're named. (I think they were out of the filling for them.) Instead, we got a special, little slightly spicy beef sausages served with the little noodle patties, a bunch of herbs, and rice paper with hot water for making our own little wraps. Very tasty little sausages. One of the more expensive items at $8.50, but who's complaining with that being our most expensive item.

Also got one of my favorite dishes, the banh khot, the little rice crepe cups filled with minced shrimp along side the herbs and lettuce. Their herbs and lettuce have always been really fresh and they give a huge pile with rau ram, mint, and basil. Also pickled carrots and daikon (I think). Could be jicama, I guess.

Also got the lotus salad with shrimp, which has a fairly sweet sauce and fresh-tasting shrimp.

Tons of food -- healthy, lots of veggies, tasty meats, good, good stuff. This place deserves more business. They have one of the more unique Vietnamese menus in town and you can several tasty, interesting dishes that no one else serves if you stay away from the pho and other noodle soups that everyone carries.

See this earlier trip there as a group where we ordered mass quantities...

http://portlandfood....p?showtopic=833

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

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Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#2 Vittles

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 08:19 PM

I have to agree. I've been to this restaurant 4 or 5 times and loved every visit. I usually order the banh xeo or bun cha. The owner is very friendly and always makes sure you're satisfied with your meal when you leave. Banh Cuon Tan Dinh is my second favorite Vietnamese restaurant behind Bun Bo Hue and I hope everyone will give them a try that has not yet.

#3 tuckerdog

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 09:14 PM

I went there last weekend with my SO and 2 of my kids, age 14 and 17
The owner is a gem.
He makes a mean smoothie, not traditional I grant you, but it was sure appreciated by the Urchins
The food was a little out there for them, as their previous Vietnamese experiences, have been limited to Pho. However, the whole friendly experience meant a good time was had by all
I loved the food, and am possibly getting some for an event this weekend
The kids keep pushing me to get some, just to give them more business
Michael

#4 Napzard

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 10:16 PM

I eat here every Friday morning. This restaurant reminds me of the restaurant my parents used to own in Little Saigon. The menu almost exact. The taste, incredibly similar.

Bun Cha is excellent here. There are 2 types of BBQ pork though. If you order the Bun Cha thit nuoung you will get the flat cut pieces, or you can request Bun Cha with just the round patties.

My wife and I have been ordering Bo La Lot as of late. These are cylindrical pieces of meat wrapped in grape leaves. Served in typical "Coun" fashion. "Cuon" means rolled or rolling depends on how it's used in a sentence. But it comes with rice paper you dip in hot water, then you add your vegetables. Be it, pickled carrots, salad, cilantro, mint, cooked green banana, and white rice noodles. You "cuon"(roll/wrap) it, dip it in the fish sauce and yah shove it down your throat =0.

If he's got it, ask him for the beef stew. Com(rice) Bo(beef) Kho(stewed) or you can get it with noodles, I always get it with the rice. As a kid I love this and I still do. Last week he was out, hopefully tomorrow he'll have some.

I'll continue to support this restaurant. Tai is the fella who does the greeting and waiting. His mom cooks as well as his sister. Their father is in the process of moving up here to help out but is kinda stuck in California at the moment. The trio works 6 days a week and are off only on Tuesdays. And they are there full time. Full time meaning 9am-10pm 6 days a week. I wanted to get Tai to come play in a poker game this past week, he unfortunately had to work.

It's downright authentic food, just dont expect the norm of Southern cuisine(Pho). Thanks for posting this eMSG They deserve the credit.

#5 polloelastico

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 11:26 PM

I eat here every Friday morning. This restaurant reminds me of the restaurant my parents used to own in Little Saigon. The menu almost exact. The taste, incredibly similar.

Bun Cha is excellent here. There are 2 types of BBQ pork though. If you order the Bun Cha thit nuoung you will get the flat cut pieces, or you can request Bun Cha with just the round patties.

My wife and I have been ordering Bo La Lot as of late. These are cylindrical pieces of meat wrapped in grape leaves. Served in typical "Coun" fashion. "Cuon" means rolled or rolling depends on how it's used in a sentence. But it comes with rice paper you dip in hot water, then you add your vegetables. Be it, pickled carrots, salad, cilantro, mint, cooked green banana, and white rice noodles. You "cuon"(roll/wrap) it, dip it in the fish sauce and yah shove it down your throat =0.

If he's got it, ask him for the beef stew. Com(rice) Bo(beef) Kho(stewed) or you can get it with noodles, I always get it with the rice. As a kid I love this and I still do. Last week he was out, hopefully tomorrow he'll have some.

I'll continue to support this restaurant. Tai is the fella who does the greeting and waiting. His mom cooks as well as his sister. Their father is in the process of moving up here to help out but is kinda stuck in California at the momentIt's downright authentic food, just dont expect the norm of Southern cuisine(Pho). Thanks for posting this eMSG They deserve the credit.


thx for the tip. i took my mom here straight from the airport, and she (and my daughter) loved her hu tieu (sic?) - rice noodle soup full meal deal with fish meatballs, sliced liver, shrimp, squid. My bun thit nuong was pretty good. i must agree the guy at the door/counter was incredibly cool, in sharp contrast to the experience i had just down the way at saigon noodle house a couple months later. i wish this place success, and will stop by this weekend for some rice noodles.

Napzard - I've seen those Bo La Lot in grape leaves at times on my mom's counter, but I've myopically avoided them. Is the meat similiar to the ground pork/meat you'll find in bun bao?

The stew - are you describing the red wine braised beef stew that's so good with crusty french bread?
“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” — George Carlin

#6 tuckerdog

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 04:43 AM

Question for the experts
What would you suggest i get to take out for my little party
IU am doing the mains myself
Need something as an App. or side or both
Has to be easy to heat up or use as a side salad as I will have to play host and will be pretty busy
Suggestions appreciated
Michael

#7 MaBell

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 05:45 AM

Isn't the bo la lat at Tanh Dinh all beef? And it's wrapped in a peppery type leaf called betel.
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#8 Napzard

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 07:07 AM

Napzard - I've seen those Bo La Lot in grape leaves at times on my mom's counter, but I've myopically avoided them. Is the meat similiar to the ground pork/meat you'll find in bun bao?

The stew - are you describing the red wine braised beef stew that's so good with crusty french bread?


It is ground pork I believe. Having not the knowledge of actually cooking it I'm sorry I can't be spot on. Is it the banh bao(steamed white bun with meat filling/egg) that you are referring to? Most of the time Banh bao contains steamed pork, however it sometimes comes with like a reddish, sweet meat.

And yah regarding the stew. A lot of folks eat it with french bread too. I'm a rice freak, whatever floats your boat. And I'm quite positive not many use red wine. Too expensive for average Vietnamese restaurants to use. The froo froo ones maybe. Again options are Bun(noodles), Com(rice), Banh Mi(French Bread). If Tai doesn't have the bread, run around the corner to Fubonn and get a couple french bread, have them toast it too. Bring it back to the restaurant and dip.
Posted Image


This is the pic of the Bo la lot I found from a google search, Tai's offering is very similar however you get about 6 or so:
Posted Image

#9 Napzard

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 07:12 AM

Isn't the bo la lat at Tanh Dinh all beef? And it's wrapped in a peppery type leaf called betel.


To be honest when it comes ground, I can't tell a difference. Look at this recipe, it calls for both lol.
BO LA LOT - LOLOT BEEF ROLL
Ingredients


* 350 gr of beef minced.
* 150 gr of pork minced
* 3 table spoon of oil for frying
* 1 tablespoon of finely chopped garlic
* 20 big La lot leaves with stems still attached
* 2 tea spoons of fish sauce
* 1 tea spoon of sugar

Method

Mix beef and pork mince together, then add garlic, sugar, fish sauce, mix well . Wash the leaves, (BETEL LEAVES )for each leave place some filling (about a heap teaspoon ) in the middle of the leave then roll from the bottom of the leave toward the stem and make a hole in the roll and insert the stem to that hole. The stem has a role of holding the filling in place. Do not worry about the sides of the roll it can be opened as soon as you fry it the meat will stick well with the leave. After rolling bit is done for all leaves. Heat the fry pan until hot, add the oil, then fry the rolls in batches may be 10 per batch for 10 minutes (slow heat) until cook. Served with rice as a main course or on its own as an entree.

Again, having no knowledge of ever cooking this, I tried to compare it to the closest thing. And grape leaves were it. Never heard of Betel leaves. Thanks for the correction.

#10 Napzard

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 07:17 AM

Question for the experts
What would you suggest i get to take out for my little party
IU am doing the mains myself
Need something as an App. or side or both
Has to be easy to heat up or use as a side salad as I will have to play host and will be pretty busy
Suggestions appreciated
Michael


If you want to keep it Asian. I would suggest the Papaya Salad from Pok Pok. Appetizers...some Goi Coun(Salad Rolls). Pho Van makes the best imo. Or get some Cha Gio(fried spring rolls). Cha Gio I'm not sure where the best is, not a fan of it.

Papaya Salad you dont need to do anything serve room temp or cold. The salad rolls room temp or cold. The fried spring rollsthey usually give you some tin foil tray that you can just pop in the oven then serve when ready.

#11 MaBell

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 07:31 AM

Again, having no knowledge of ever cooking this, I tried to compare it to the closest thing. And grape leaves were it. Never heard of Betel leaves. Thanks for the correction.


I get the Bo La Lot almost every time I eat there, so I had to ask. Not only did Tai tell me, he then had his sister come out of the kitchen and talk more about them. They are both such nice people who are very eager to please their customers.

Now I'm craving those sausages.
Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Ham?
Lisa: No.
Homer: Pork chops?
Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.

#12 ExtraMSG

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 10:43 AM

bo la lot was the special, btw. They make it with all beef, I think. It's not on the normal menu.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#13 amtbr

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 01:11 PM

Ate here yesterday, we were going to wongs but it seems like every holiday weekend wongs turns into a mad house. So we tried Banh and we were very impressed. Highly recomended!

#14 EvaB

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 11:05 PM

Would this place be OK for fish eating vegetarians?
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#15 ExtraMSG

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 11:29 PM

I think so. A lot of their dishes have multiple choices for meat and among the choices shrimp is almost always one of them. I don't have the menu in front of me, though, but I think that's the case. It'd be better for someone who isn't a huge fan of meat, like my wife, but likes the flavor of it with lots of veggies, etc.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#16 loofahgirl

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 07:10 AM

Would this place be OK for fish eating vegetarians?


Totally; I loved it. Also we took a vegetarian's vegetarian there and even she found food for herself!

(WHoops, I'm sorry, I thought I was posting in Malay Satay.) :D

#17 Leonardo

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 01:23 PM

I must try this place. It sounds great! Thanks Nick for the review and calling our attention to them.

Would this place be OK for fish eating vegetarians?


I've vegetarian leanings but wouldn't dream of calling myself one, resulting from my lapses into seafood about twice a week, sometimes other things too. Can't for the life of me understand why people who eat fish call themselves vegetarians. The above reminds me of the following hilarious article from The Onion:


DESPERATE VEGETARIANS DECLARE COWS PLANTS

LAS VEGAS -- At its annual national conference Saturday, the American Association of Vegans and Vegetarians released results of a detailed in-house study determining that the common beef cow is actually a plant, 100 percent fit for vegetarian consumption.

"Contrary to what was previously thought, the cow is not a higher form of animal life, capable of thinking and feeling pain," announced AAVV spokeswoman Denise Chalmers to the large crowd. "Rather, we have found it to be a harmless, non-sentient form of plant life, utterly incapable of experiencing the slightest pain or simplest thought."

Chalmers then passed around a large tray of dripping red meat, which the vegetarians in attendance ravenously devoured, feverishly licking the bloody juice from their fingers.

According to the AAVV researchers who conducted the study, cows feature many of the basic characteristics of plants. In addition to possessing roots, leaves and branches, cows produce pollen, which in the springtime is eagerly devoured by honey bees.

"The bees swarm feverishly around the cow, eager to get a taste of its delicious nectar," Chalmers said. "The cow, however, is usually too busy taking up water through its hooves, or 'roots,' to even notice."

Cows, say researchers, also practice photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert sunlight into chemical energy.

"When exposed to sunlight, the cow produces chlorophyll," researcher Darrick Holten explained. "The cow then uses the chlorophyll to produce chemical energy."

Added Holten: "A very similar process occurs in chickens."

According to Chalmers, the study's findings will not alter the AAVV's basic viewpoint. "Animals still should not be eaten, and meat is murder," she said.
The study results also shed new light on the reproductive process of cows, which had been shrouded in mystery since the animal was discovered 200 years ago.

"Cows reproduce much like the common pine tree," Holten said. "They develop a hard, bristly, fertilized cone, drop it on the ground and await the natural elements of wind, rain and animal life to carry it to open forest territory."

Overall reaction at the conference was muted at first, as many of the vegetarians expressed surprise, then glee, at the unexpected announcement. Some rushed madly to the trays of processed lunch meats lined up on buffet tables around the hall, knocking over bystanders and onlookers in a mad dash for freshly carved roast beef.

"It does not taste anything like meat," vegetarian Tina Mothersby said. "It's chewy like a boiled carrot or even like a nice chunk of sourdough bread."

Added Chalmers: "Cows are plants, and we feel pretty silly for avoiding them for as long as we have. Inside the stockyard warehouse near my Chicago home is not a meat locker, but a plant locker, and that fetid stench is not one of cow heads festering in a maggot-covered pile, but rather of ripe vegetables ready to be prepared in myriad delicious ways."

Due to the overwhelming acceptance on the part of the vegetarian crowd, the AAVV announced plans to move ahead with studies proving that the pig and duck are plants. Mutton, however, is still meat. -- Janury 23, 1996
Homer, upon seeing an ear of corn at a market: "Interesting...it reminds me of a corndog, only without the dog!"

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#18 EvaB

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 12:51 AM

OK, I agree with you, but in the case I'm thinking of perhaps I should have said "a mostly vegetarian who will occasionally eat fish."
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twenty-eight divine creations too delicious to resist,
why not do yourself a favor, try the flavors on my list...


#19 Leonardo

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 07:58 AM

Sorry, I wasn't trying to pick on you or single you out. It's just something I hear constantly, and saw an opportunity to share a funny piece.
Homer, upon seeing an ear of corn at a market: "Interesting...it reminds me of a corndog, only without the dog!"

Thanks to http://kawaiinot.com/icons.php for the avatar.

#20 EvaB

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 05:48 PM

no offense taken! It is funny. Personally, I'll eat damn near anything, if it's good!
Cool Moon Ice Cream

with apologies to Jack Prelutsky's "Bleezer's Ice Cream Store"

I am Eva Marianna
I run COOL MOON ICE CREAM STORE,
there are flavors in my freezer you have never seen before,
twenty-eight divine creations too delicious to resist,
why not do yourself a favor, try the flavors on my list...