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#1 polloelastico

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 11:30 AM

Hey, I gave this a shot:

 

 

I kind of flew blind on this, however. I used a 2-inch thick T-bone steak, and 275 seemed a bit high for me so I actually went for an hour at 225. I let it rest also for like 90+ minutes because I was watching a very important Los Angeles Dodger playoff win. And I seared it a minute on each side on my Weber gas grill (with cast iron grates) after preheating for 20 minutes.

 

The steak turned out fantastic! Nice and medium-rare throughout. I ate it.

 

 


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#2 WAfoodie

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 12:23 PM

Learned this from the pros on TV. I cook a 2-in. steak (T-bone, rib-eye, or strip) on the backyard gas grill with the heat at 450+ degrees for 17 min. (8 min side one, flip, 9 min. side two). It cooks to a medium-rare and quite reliable. After resting the meat, I slice it into 1-in. thick slices.



#3 nervousxtian

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 03:16 PM

I've done it, came out good.. but IMHO not worth the extra effort.     I typically just cast iron skillet on the stovetop and finish in the oven.     Get proper temps with ease, takes less time and tastes great without the hassle.

 

the reverse-sear is nice, but not sure it's an extra 1.5hrs of worrying about it nice.



#4 jennifer

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 05:33 PM

I'm going to try this reverse method because I always seem to overcook it with the sear-roast method.  And when I'm spending big bucks on a gorgeous cut, I cry when it's overcooked.



#5 StMaximo

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 06:48 PM

I've found that pulling the meat out of the refrigerator a couple of hours before cooking it, seasoning it and then grilling or searing works pretty well for me. 

 

Alternately, if I have a lot of time and especially if I have a really thick steak I like the low roast and then sear on a hot grill or in a hot pan method. America's Test Kitchen had a method where you seasoned the steaks and brought them to room temperature and then cooked them for 20-30 minutes in an oven at 200 F and then seared them. This has worked well for me.

 

I've also used the Alton Brown method with good results. Season the steak and let it come to room temperature. Pre-heat the oven to 500 degrees with a cast iron grill in the oven getting nice and hot. When it's at 500 degrees, move the pan to the stove top heated high and sear the steaks  30 seconds on each side. When the second side is seared, move the pan back to the oven and let the steaks cook for 2 minutes - then flip and 2 minutes more. If it's a very thick steak I'll go 3 minutes. This is for a rare/med rare steak. Take the steaks out of the pan and let them rest for a couple of minutes tented with foil on a warm plate.

 

The biggest things for me are: Buy a good steak. Season it and bring it to room temperature. Don't overcook it (use a meat thermometer or slice it for a peek). Be with people you really enjoy. Drink good wine or beer.

 

Jennifer - it's a much greater crime to serve it overcooked than undercooked! ;)



#6 Angelhair

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:18 PM

I tried this tonight.  There's something to be said for the good long rest on the rack.  It really does dry out the exterior making a very nice crust.  This perfect crust, and to a much lesser extent the even temperature of the inside, is the reason why this is my new method.

 

I cooked at the video's 275 and used a probe thermometer to 125 degrees (before the rest and the sear).

 

The sear is very fast using this method.  Like just over a minute in a pre-heated pan.



#7 polloelastico

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 11:54 AM

Jennifer emailed me a couple weeks ago saying the hangar steaks at Zupan's were on sale for $7.99, and when I picked up a few they were indeed at that price. But for those who were kind of in the know about Zupan's hangar steak deal (and their insane $4.99 special price), well it was too good to last. I stopped by Zupan's Friday and the hangar is back to its "normal" price, which is $10.99/lb.

 

I did, however get a pound filet of teres major. Zupan's describes their hangars as "hanging tenders" and this similarly had the word "hanging" in the description but it's this cut:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoulder_tender 

http://www.grassland...tail.bok?no=507

 
It was $8.99/lb at sale price (marked down from $11.99). I did the method of slow/low in the oven for a bit less than an hour at 250 degrees, then rest for 40 minutes, then finish in hot pan for just less than a minute per side. This cut technically had "four" sides, and the steak turned out beautifully color wise, medium rare throughout (except at the extremities as towards the ends as this cut tapers at the ends). 
 
Not sure if I'm sold on the cut though - it wasn't all the flavorful and "beefy" as I expected and quite honestly I wish I would have just got a hangar steak at full price. I've had this cut at Anchor and Hope in San Francisco though and it was pretty amazing so I'm sure with more care in the kitchen and a better source you can really do something nice with this, but it's definitely not as forgiving as hangar and you'll need to definitely introduce more fat (I just used a bit in the pan) as it's very lean. It did make an excellent (sliced thin) steak sandwich the next day with a bit of mayo, on toasted sourdough.

“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” — George Carlin

#8 jennifer

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 07:47 AM

Great video at the bottom of this page showing the cast iron skillet method followed by a browned butter baste.  I know there's always discussion on this everywhere, but for anyone who might need a visual reference, this is a great one.

 

http://www.tastingta...rfect_Steak.htm



#9 jafar

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 07:57 AM

How thick does it have to be before it is no longer a steak?



#10 StMaximo

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 10:01 PM

I've cooked some 2.5 inch filets and some 3 inch bisteca cuts like steak using the grill then finish in the oven method. It does seem like you're almost in small roast territory there, but I suppose some of it is the cut of the meat as well

 

I bought a sous vide machine around Christmas time and have had good luck cooking steaks with it.  Vacuum pack the steaks after seasoning with some salt & pepper and a bit of thyme and cook at 133 F for two or three hours and then finish for a minute a side on a very hot grill or skillet.

 

The price of sous vide machines is now under two hundred dollars which puts them in the range for most folks I know. I'd buy one just to cook eggs now that I've discovered that sous vide eggs are one of my favorite things

 

Edited for clarity.



#11 nervousxtian

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 02:25 PM

Yeah, I got one of those Anova locked in at $129 on the Kickstarter... can't wait to play with it.



#12 StMaximo

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 08:22 PM

I've got a Sansaire, but that new Anova is a sweet looking machine and the ability to set and monitor it from a smartphone.......Well, I almost had a second SV machine.



#13 nervousxtian

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 11:55 AM

Seemed like a steal for what it's upgraded over the others... especially if you got in at the $100 or $130 tier.

 

I almost went with the 2 pack for 229.. but no one else wanted to go in with me until after the price jumped.



#14 jennifer

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 11:19 AM

Tried smoking a porterhouse last night for the first time.  Birthday steak for Max.  He picked up a 2.5" cut at Chop, salted it heavily, then smoked it at 225°F to start and dropped it down to 150°F to finish.  Pulled it at an internal temp of 115°F.  1 hour 45 min total.  Threw it in the gas grill at 600°F for the end sear.  

 

+++Just tried posting pics & got an error msg "you are not allowed to use that image extension in this community."  Not sure what's going on there. 

 

Link to pics here: 

https://lh3.googleus...E=w1252-h705-no

https://lh3.googleus...k=w1252-h705-no

 

It was damn good but I have a two lessons learned:

 

Get cherry or apple wood for beef instead of hickory.  I thought the hickory gave too harsh a flavor finish.

Sear in broiler, on the Hibachi, or in a cast iron skillet at the end.  The gas grill didn't give the outside crust I'm really looking for.

 

These are minor quibbles, but if we're going through the effort & expense of doing this, these are little things that will get us closer to perfect next time.  It was perfectly rare end-to-end and evenly cooked from edge-to-bone. 



#15 WAfoodie

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 02:30 PM

Jennifer,

Your steak looks luscious. How did you know to drop the smoke temp from 225 to 150?



#16 ExtraMSG

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 02:39 PM

I don't think the broiler would give you the results you want.  The way to go is just to leave a cast iron on high for 10 minutes or so.  

 

I prefer oak to hickory just because hickory always makes everything taste like ham to me.  But if it was harsh, it may just be too much smoke and not good airflow.  It's not like you were even smoking it that long, I would think, given that you weren't cooking it to a very high temp.


The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

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Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#17 jennifer

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 09:45 PM

I don't think the broiler would give you the results you want.  The way to go is just to leave a cast iron on high for 10 minutes or so.  

 

I prefer oak to hickory just because hickory always makes everything taste like ham to me.  But if it was harsh, it may just be too much smoke and not good airflow.  It's not like you were even smoking it that long, I would think, given that you weren't cooking it to a very high temp.

 

I think you're right on the cast iron skillet.  I just avoid it because of the clean-up mess, but it really is the only thing that will get the results I'm looking for.

 

We smoked baby backs tonight using cherry wood, and they were fantastic!  225°F for 2.5 hours.  6 racks from Singing Pig Farms. Quality and flavor of this pork is light years better than the grocery store or Costco's.  Prices are similar to standard Safeway prices and so much better in texture and flavor.  He sells all kinds of retail cuts (you don't have to commit to a pig share, you can just buy x many chops, etc.) and he'll meet you almost anywhere around town.  I've done pickups downtown from him while he was on route for restaurant deliveries, and I've done a pickup out here on the Westside.  You can get in touch with him on Facebook or here, or I can give you his contact info. 

 

I don't think we'll be going back to hickory.  I want to get some apple wood to try, and a couple of others and start to figure out the differences in flavors on the meat. 

 

I'm going to post this in another thread, but we've got a huge bag of cherry wood that would take us forever to go through.  If someone has apple, pecan or something else (other than mesquite or hickory) and wants to trade a couple of logs for cherry wood, let me know! 



#18 jennifer

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 09:49 PM

Jennifer,

Your steak looks luscious. How did you know to drop the smoke temp from 225 to 150?

 

It seemed like it was cooking too fast at 225.  Our target temp was 115, and it hit 95 in 45 minutes, so I dropped the temp to 125 and it slowed to barely moving, so I moved it to 150 for the final 10 degrees.  Just to where I could see the wisps of smoke coming out of the top. 

 

I have nothing really to base "it's cooking to fast" on, other than it seemed too fast to me and Max was still at swim practice with Ava, and we didn't want the steak done & sitting around for 30 minutes. 

 

Sorry I don't have a better explanation, total amateur here!



#19 ExtraMSG

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 11:46 AM

I don't think the broiler would give you the results you want.  The way to go is just to leave a cast iron on high for 10 minutes or so.  

 

I prefer oak to hickory just because hickory always makes everything taste like ham to me.  But if it was harsh, it may just be too much smoke and not good airflow.  It's not like you were even smoking it that long, I would think, given that you weren't cooking it to a very high temp.

 

I think you're right on the cast iron skillet.  I just avoid it because of the clean-up mess, but it really is the only thing that will get the results I'm looking for.

 

http://www.seriousea...red-steaks.html


The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#20 nervousxtian

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 01:16 PM

I'm not a big fan of smoked reverse sear steaks..   the smokiness doesn't really add to a good cut of steak IMHO. 

 

Smoked prime rib?   Great.. but I'd just do the steak in the oven next, or over really low charcoal.. but no smoke.    I've tried it a few times and the smoke flavor really just get's in the way of the great beefiness of a good steak like a porterhouse, strip or ribeye.