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Teote Areparia - 1615 SE 12th Ave


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#1 Jill-O

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 01:32 PM

The new areparia from the Fuego de Lotus cart is open now on SE 12th, on the block just south of the Burgerville on SE Hawthorne.

 

http://www.teotepdx.com/

 

Eater had a little blurb from Dina Avila (the aweseome photographer) about it: http://pdx.eater.com...-to-se-12th.php

 

 


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#2 ExtraMSG

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 08:55 PM

Here's the Fuego thread for historical interest:

 

http://portlandfood....fuego-de-lotus/

 

I only tried them once and wasn't a fan of the arepas.  It wouldn't be hard to do better than Caracas Arepa Bar in NY and people seem to go ga-ga over it there.  The space looks cool. Hopefully they're able to do the arepas better in the new digs.


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#3 ibgpdx

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 11:40 AM

I went to Teote a couple weeks ago and thought it was okay.  I had the Simpatico plate which consisted of black beans, rice, cabbage salad, salad, fried plantains and queso served with a buttered arepa.

 

The beans, rice, and plantains were well done but the remaining items were bland.  I never had an arepa before, found it to be dense and bit greasy.

 

But the decor is very cool. 



#4 ExtraMSG

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 02:27 PM

I don't understand why no one seems to be able to make a good arepa.  It's not hard.


The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

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#5 StMaximo

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 04:50 PM

It's been a while, probably not long enough, but here's my dumbass question for the day. What's the difference between an arepa and a pupusa? It looks like they're pretty much the same thing except for the filling and the location they originate.


#6 ExtraMSG

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 07:44 PM

A closer comparison would be gorditas vs arepas, which are very similar in construction and use.  The filling for a pupusa is enclosed before cooking whereas with arepas and gorditas, the patty is usually cooked first, cut open, then filled.

 

However, pupusas and Mexican antojitos primarily use nixtamalized corn (ie, Mexican-style hominy).  Arepas, though, are made with a pre-cooked and re-dried cornmeal, sort of like finely texture instant polenta.  The flavor, texture, and nutrition are all different because of this.  Masa harina (eg, Maseca) would be similar to masa arepa in that it's cooked, then ground, then dried, except it's made from nixtamalized corn. As opposed to arepas, there are also cachapas, which are made using fresh corn. Arepas aren't entirely unlike a johnny cake or corn pone.


The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

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#7 StMaximo

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 09:23 PM

A closer comparison would be gorditas vs arepas, which are very similar in construction and use.  The filling for a pupusa is enclosed before cooking whereas with arepas and gorditas, the patty is usually cooked first, cut open, then filled.

 

However, pupusas and Mexican antojitos primarily use nixtamalized corn (ie, Mexican-style hominy).  Arepas, though, are made with a pre-cooked and re-dried cornmeal, sort of like finely texture instant polenta.  The flavor, texture, and nutrition are all different because of this.  Masa harina (eg, Maseca) would be similar to masa arepa in that it's cooked, then ground, then dried. As opposed to arepas, there are also cachapas, which are made using fresh corn. Arepas aren't entirely unlike a johnny cake or corn pone.

 

My dad made Johnny Cakes for us when I was younger. I'll stick with pupusas from the cart out on 102nd and Stark for now.

 

Thanks for explaining the not so subtle differences.



#8 ariel88

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 08:47 AM

I had dinner at Teote a couple of nights ago, and I'm guessing they must've really stepped up their game since this thread was last updated, because the food was fantastic.

 

We shared a half order of fried sweet plantains, which come topped with lime, queso and a cilantro based verde sauce. I really liked the tangy accent to the intense sweetness of the plantains. Simple, but really good.

 

Their arepas don't come split open and stuffed with filling like I've had before, but instead you get a bowl filled with the "filling" and then the arepa (about the size of my palm) is split open and served on the side (or rather, it is served sticking out of the top of the bowl). You eat them by basically spooning the filling onto the surface of the arepa and then taking a bite of the whole thing, which works well.

 

I ordered the Pabellon Arepa (Painted Hills brisket braised with sweet peppers, onions and shredded, topped with black beans, verde sauce, plantain sauce, smoked gouda and cilantro) and DH had the Mole Arepa (Painted Hills brisket cooked slow in our homemade mole sauce shredded, topped with pickled onions, crema, queso fresco and cilantro). In both cases, the brisket was tender, very juicy, and packed with flavor. The arepa was crispy on the outside but dense and soft on the inside. Really nice texture. I'm a sucker for contrasts like that. And I have to mention that our 2 orders of arepas and a half order of plantains = dinner for less than $20. Seriously? That's an excellent value. Especially when you consider that the bowl was primarily full of meat, not beans and other toppings.

 

As a comparison, I've been to Caracas Arepa Bar in NYC, and I wasn't that impressed. This was loads better in terms of flavor and in terms of the taste and texture of the arepas (I can't speak to what arepas are "supposed" to be like, so take that with a grain of salt, I guess).

 

Regardless, this place was a great value and seriously delicious. If you were holding off because of lukewarm reviews, I urge you to go and let them change your mind. I will definitely be back, maybe even as soon as this weekend....



#9 ExtraMSG

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 08:50 PM

Teote has definitely improved over my experiences with Fuego.  My experience at Teote was definitely better than Arepa Bar in NYC as well. (Just one more example of NYers thinking anything in NY must be "THE BEST".  I wouldn't rate Arepa Bar's arepas in the top 20 I've had in the US.)


The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole & Kenny & Zuke's