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House Smoked Coppa Steak


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#1 John DePaula

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 07:12 AM

So has anyone seen a recipe online for the House Smoked Coppa Steak like they serve at Toro Bravo. That's just about my favorite dish in town and I'd like to give it a try at home, though I know it will never be as good as at the restaurant.

What do you think: Chop or Laurelhurst Market may be able to help?

Thank you very much!
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#2 Quo Vadis

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 08:14 AM

I can't claim to know TB's technique but back in my days of cooking western food this was the most common way to handle it:

set up a salt cure rub, seasoned as you like
rub well into the surface of the meat, hang for 3-6 days (depending on taste plus your refrigeration resources
cold smoke (what kind of wood is personal preference, I personally dislike mesquite for this though)to desired level of smoke (anywhere from 4-10 hours)
let rest, cut into steaks
sear over very hot grill
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#3 John DePaula

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 11:47 AM

Thanks very much - sounds great! I haven't done any hot or cold smoking but it's high on my list of things to learn about. Thanks again.
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You cannot legislate compassion into your fellow man (or woman, as the case may be), but we should at least attempt to create a society in which each individual has the opportunity to realize his or her potential. If we meet our citizens' needs for Health Care and Education, everything else will take care of itself. --Me

#4 polloelastico

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 03:43 PM

Liz Crain can give you the recipe: http://www.lizcrain....toportlandblog/

She's teaming with Gorham to write the official Toro Bravo cookbook - though I imagine she might want you to wait and buy the book when it comes out, but a personal appeal might work.
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#5 John DePaula

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 09:34 AM

Liz Crain can give you the recipe: http://www.lizcrain....toportlandblog/

She's teaming with Gorham to write the official Toro Bravo cookbook - though I imagine she might want you to wait and buy the book when it comes out, but a personal appeal might work.

Official Toro Bravo cookbook?! I am definitely down for that. Thanks for the info!
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#6 nate

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 04:15 PM

Thanks very much - sounds great! I haven't done any hot or cold smoking but it's high on my list of things to learn about. Thanks again.

Unless you have the right gear (and actually, even if you do), cold smoking can be a royal pain in the ass. I hot smoke a lot of stuff (probably well over 100 lbs a year, which for a home cook is quite a bit) and have only cold-smoked once cuz it was such a pain.

Since commercial solutions aren't cheap, you'll probably want to make your own (unless you wanna fork out $300-400 for a Bradley Smoker, which I've heard is the only "inexpensive" model worth having). The best/cheapest/easiest setups I've seen have a smoking chamber (either a cast iron pan set on a hot plate with an improvised lid OR a metal container with a hole in the side for a heat gun) connected to the smoke box (a cardboard box will do, but if you plan on reusing it, wood or metal is better) by a length of aluminum dryer ducting. You can Google instructions for how to build one, or just wing it (I've had friends do it with reasonable success). I would probably recommend getting comfortable with hot smoking first, but they're different enough that you could jump right into cold smoking and not miss too much (and hot smoking will be a cake-walk).

#7 John DePaula

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 05:11 PM


Thanks very much - sounds great! I haven't done any hot or cold smoking but it's high on my list of things to learn about. Thanks again.

Unless you have the right gear (and actually, even if you do), cold smoking can be a royal pain in the ass. I hot smoke a lot of stuff (probably well over 100 lbs a year, which for a home cook is quite a bit) and have only cold-smoked once cuz it was such a pain.

Since commercial solutions aren't cheap, you'll probably want to make your own (unless you wanna fork out $300-400 for a Bradley Smoker, which I've heard is the only "inexpensive" model worth having). The best/cheapest/easiest setups I've seen have a smoking chamber (either a cast iron pan set on a hot plate with an improvised lid OR a metal container with a hole in the side for a heat gun) connected to the smoke box (a cardboard box will do, but if you plan on reusing it, wood or metal is better) by a length of aluminum dryer ducting. You can Google instructions for how to build one, or just wing it (I've had friends do it with reasonable success). I would probably recommend getting comfortable with hot smoking first, but they're different enough that you could jump right into cold smoking and not miss too much (and hot smoking will be a cake-walk).

Thanks for the info, nate! I found this site Cold Smoker Conversion and it looks interesting. Pressed for time at the moment but will look into it. If you have other suggestions, pls don't hesitate to post.
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You cannot legislate compassion into your fellow man (or woman, as the case may be), but we should at least attempt to create a society in which each individual has the opportunity to realize his or her potential. If we meet our citizens' needs for Health Care and Education, everything else will take care of itself. --Me

#8 TastyTidbits1

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 05:29 PM



Thanks very much - sounds great! I haven't done any hot or cold smoking but it's high on my list of things to learn about. Thanks again.

Unless you have the right gear (and actually, even if you do), cold smoking can be a royal pain in the ass. I hot smoke a lot of stuff (probably well over 100 lbs a year, which for a home cook is quite a bit) and have only cold-smoked once cuz it was such a pain.

Since commercial solutions aren't cheap, you'll probably want to make your own (unless you wanna fork out $300-400 for a Bradley Smoker, which I've heard is the only "inexpensive" model worth having). The best/cheapest/easiest setups I've seen have a smoking chamber (either a cast iron pan set on a hot plate with an improvised lid OR a metal container with a hole in the side for a heat gun) connected to the smoke box (a cardboard box will do, but if you plan on reusing it, wood or metal is better) by a length of aluminum dryer ducting. You can Google instructions for how to build one, or just wing it (I've had friends do it with reasonable success). I would probably recommend getting comfortable with hot smoking first, but they're different enough that you could jump right into cold smoking and not miss too much (and hot smoking will be a cake-walk).

Thanks for the info, nate! I found this site Cold Smoker Conversion and it looks interesting. Pressed for time at the moment but will look into it. If you have other suggestions, pls don't hesitate to post.

I love the coppa too and have mulled over my approach. I would smoke the beef in my smoker for an hour on low heat - just enough to get great smoke on and in it - then put it in a low heat oven like you're cooking prime rib. I would love to use (and suspect they do) an alto-shaam.

#9 nate

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 11:11 AM

Yeah, if you've already got a bullet, something like that would work great. You could probably even do it with a regular kettle grill. It's still a pain in the ass though.

#10 hamhock

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 07:02 AM

I've posted the link on another thread somewhere but I've had great results using a clean soldering iron, a tin can and smoking pellets. Just do a search on the interwebs for 'cold smoker soldering iron.'

#11 John DePaula

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 07:53 AM

I've posted the link on another thread somewhere but I've had great results using a clean soldering iron, a tin can and smoking pellets. Just do a search on the interwebs for 'cold smoker soldering iron.'

Well that seems dead simple: Build a Cold-Smoker. Thanks!
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You cannot legislate compassion into your fellow man (or woman, as the case may be), but we should at least attempt to create a society in which each individual has the opportunity to realize his or her potential. If we meet our citizens' needs for Health Care and Education, everything else will take care of itself. --Me

#12 Aaron

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 10:58 AM

Not to be overlooked is the meat itself that Toro uses - coppa from Tails & Trotters. The hazelnut-finished fat takes up flavors from both the cure & smoke differently than harder grain-produced fat.

Whole (5-6lb) coppa or 1-2lb chunks can be picked up at T&T's farmers markets, or by arrangement from its commercial kitchen (KitchenCru).

#13 TastyTidbits1

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 01:48 PM

Not to be overlooked is the meat itself that Toro uses - coppa from Tails & Trotters. The hazelnut-finished fat takes up flavors from both the cure & smoke differently than harder grain-produced fat.

Whole (5-6lb) coppa or 1-2lb chunks can be picked up at T&T's farmers markets, or by arrangement from its commercial kitchen (KitchenCru).

The coppa they've served me on the past was beef...

#14 jennifer

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 02:33 PM

Welcome to the site Aaron! The Coppa from T&T is my all time favorite cut from you guys. But like TastyTidbits mentioned, the Coppa Steak from Toro Bravo that I've had in the past has also been beef.