Jump to content


Photo

Albondigas - Mi Mero Mole style


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Cheryl

Cheryl
  • Members
  • 34 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 13 February 2012 - 11:08 AM

Hey Nick:

What are the chances you'd share your albondigas recipe? If not the exact recipe, could you describe generally how you make them? Particularly, I'd love to know how you get them so tender (almost fall-apart tender). I made some yesterday using a modified Rick Bayless recipe but changed the meat to beef, pork, and bacon. They tasted great, but a bit firm. I seared them in a pan then finished them off in a tomato chipotle sauce.

Cheryl

#2 ExtraMSG

ExtraMSG
  • Admin
  • 18,350 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Felony Flats
  • Interests:Me like food.

Posted 13 February 2012 - 12:17 PM

Ours are beef, pork, and diced ham stuffed with an egg. We don't pan fry them. We just braise them in the tomato-chipotle sauce. In my experience, pan-frying meatballs tends to make them chewier. I'd suggest baking them instead if you want color.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#3 Cheryl

Cheryl
  • Members
  • 34 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 13 February 2012 - 01:23 PM

Thanks!

Ours are beef, pork, and diced ham stuffed with an egg. We don't pan fry them. We just braise them in the tomato-chipotle sauce. In my experience, pan-frying meatballs tends to make them chewier. I'd suggest baking them instead if you want color.



#4 Rwoof1

Rwoof1
  • Members
  • 10 posts

Posted 18 February 2012 - 10:08 AM

I had these last night and they were hands down the best meatballs that I have ever eaten. Perfect texture, moist and succulent in a very flavorful sauce. Really off the chart goodness.

On a separate note Nick, with all of the Spanish and German influence in Mexican culture, why do you think that there isn't there more charcuterie in Mexican cuisine?

#5 ExtraMSG

ExtraMSG
  • Admin
  • 18,350 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Felony Flats
  • Interests:Me like food.

Posted 18 February 2012 - 11:18 AM

Is charcuterie ever common in warm, especially tropical, climates, beyond air-dried things? That said, there is a lot more there than you might think. Mercado San Juan in DF has several high end cheese and charcuterie vendors.

http://goodfoodmexic...o-san-juan.html

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's