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Irving Street Kitchen and Step 5 Productions to Host Benefit - October 1st, 2011


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#1 Step5Productions

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 04:26 PM

Event:
The 2nd Annual Bootleggers Ball

Where:
Irving Street Kitchen
701 NW 13th Avenue
Portland, OR 97209

When:
October 1st, 2011 - 7pm – 1am

What:
The Bootleggers Ball is a 21 and over 1920’s period-themed cocktail event hosted by Step 5 Productions benefitting Trillium Family Services – Oregon’s largest provider of youth mental health services. Last year at the first annual Bootleggers Ball, Step 5 Productions brought in over $83,000 for Trillium. The event will include live entertainment, a band, dancing, amazing silent auction items, an open bar, gourmet food, DJ and other fun surprises. Ticket prices range from $75 (under 35) to $125 (over 35)

Menu created by the Chef of Irving Street Kitchen especially for the Bootleggers Ball:
  • Open Bar: signature cocktails, all well options, multiple beer and wine selections
  • Food Stations: Aged Prime Rib with Smoked Smashed Potatoes, T&T Ham with Black Trumpet and Squash Hash, Live Shucked Oysters, Mescalin Vegetable Salad
  • Passed: Pork Belly Reubens, BBQ Shrimp and Biscuits, Basil Stuffed Clams, Brussel Sprouts and Chantrelles, Deviled Eggs, Gravlox and Caviar
  • Dessert: Bourbon Truffles, Guinness Lollypops, Kettle Corn, Cotton Candy, Red Velvet Cupcakes
  • Late Night: Fried Mac n Cheese, Chicken Wings
  • Late Late Night: Tacos from the food Cart – Pink Taco!


Step 5 Productions is a non-profit organization based in Portland, Oregon originally founded by five young adults. Passionate about making a difference in the local community, Step 5 focuses on giving back to local charities by raising awareness to different issues involving the community. In addition to all members having full-time jobs – through volunteering, planning and hosting events, Step 5 aims to bridge the gap between a network of young adults with an older more established group of processionals and volunteers.

For more information or to purchase tickets, please go to our website: Official Step 5 Productions Website
Like us on Facebook! Facebook - Step 5 Productions
Follow us on Twitter! Twitter - Step 5 Productions


Contact Information:
info@step5productions.org

#2 polloelastico

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 02:50 PM

Ticket prices range from $75 (under 35) to $125 (over 35)


Please clarify.
“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” — George Carlin

#3 Calabrese

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 05:21 PM

Ticket prices range from $75 (under 35) to $125 (over 35)


Please clarify.


Really. If you are under 35 years of age, tickets are $75. If you are over 35 years of age, tickets are $125. I am not sure that kind of age discrimination is legal but there it is.

#4 Nacho_B

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 06:38 PM

¡Santo cielo!

Where was Step 5 Productions on the day I turned 35? I woke up that morning thinking, "Now that I've lived 35 years I hope there is some way I can pay nearly twice what I would have paid yesterday to get into a Step 5 Productions event that seeks to bridge the gap between a network of young adults with an older more established group of processionals (sic) and volunteers... who apparently will be expected to pay more than their share based on the fact that they have lived past the ripe old age of 35".

¡Dios mío!

#5 polloelastico

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 07:55 PM

Step 5 aims to bridge the gap between a network of young adults with an older more established group of processionals and volunteers.

If you think of about it that way, then the $50 sugar-daddy/cougar surcharge is a pretty good bargain, actually.
“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” — George Carlin

#6 Step5Productions

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 10:21 PM

Like mentioned above, our goal is to provide an incentive for a generation of younger adults to become more involved in giving-back and to try and shake the mold of a typical charity function. We have received nothing but positive feedback and encouragement from the older generational group for bringing new perspectives and philanthropic supporters - mostly that it's nice to see young people stepping up. In the end this is all about raising money for a good cause, and it's interesting to see only negative-toned comments about the event on this particular forum.

#7 polloelastico

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 10:16 AM

I commend you for your charity. My wife worked for Trillium for 7 years - they definitely need the money.

But we're a cynical bunch here. Maybe you can understand how being charged $50 extra because you don't know who Girl Talk is can be a bit disconcerting to those who aren't blessed with the joie de vivre of youth.

Also, how do you determine who gets charged extra? Are you carding people who look like they may have a 401k? Demanding to see if any credit card bills show itemized charges for Grecian Formula or Salon Pas pain relief patches?
“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” — George Carlin

#8 Step5Productions

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 10:45 AM

No - I don't understand how it is so disconcerting. Generally speaking - an older generation typically has more resources to get involved in this way (not because they don't know who Girl Talk is) and we hope by offering a lower price gives those in our network the opportunity to give back while doing something fun. Everyone who has shown us support and those who have already purchased their tickets have been honest regarding the age group they purchased in - leaving us no reason and no desire to monitor our supporters. So far - our guest list includes about half and half from each age group - EXACTLY how we wanted this event to be - bringing new and experienced charity-supporters together. So we are thankful for all those supporters who have helped make this event happen and have not just chosen to take a cynical approach.

#9 Nacho_B

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 01:23 PM

No - I don't understand how it is so disconcerting. Generally speaking - an older generation typically has more resources to get involved in this way...


Hola,

It sounds like you are working for a noble cause. The youth, after all, are our future, and I wish you the best of luck. Fund raising is a difficult process in the best of times, and these are far from the best of times. The problem (for me at least) is that your pricing structure is (by definition) discriminatory and your "generally speaking" assumption that anyone older than 35 "has more resources" is fallacious.

35 is an arbitrary cut off, but I understand that if we're going to tier prices based on age there must be a defined tier structure. This would lead to the (ridiculous and hypothetical) situation that Mark Zuckerberg (CEO of Facebook, 27 years old with an estimated wealth > 17 Billion $US) would pay $50 less than Nacho_B for attending your fundraising event. At the same time, I would pay the same entry fee as Bill Gates. A homeless Vietnam war veteran would wind up paying $50 more than a homeless Operation Iraqi Freedom vet. All hypothetical examples, to be sure, but they illustrate the point. Basing a fee structure solely on another person's age ignores the rest of the circumstances of that person's life.

Oh sure, there are discounts for some groups. Senior citizen receive discounts in restaurants and public transportation. There are student discounts for movies and public transit. In India, there's an entry fee for the Taj Mahal for foreigners, and a (substantially discounted) fee for Indians. Someone has to make a decision as to where the discounts apply. What age defines a "senior citizen"? Do graduate students older than 35 qualify for student discounts? Do Pakistanis qualify for the "Indian" price of admission to the Taj Mahal? These are legitimate questions.

My immediate reaction to seeing your fee-structuring was "that's discriminatory" (which it is) and then "that's exploitative" (which is arguable, but still seems that way to me). Either way, here I sit on the other side of 35 years old. I am not an "older established professional", and I have a limited amount of funds to dedicate to charity. 89.9 FM (Portland's 24 hour commercial-free listener-supported classical radio station) is in the midst of their annual fall pledge drive. They simply ask for a donation that's within one's budget, they don't discriminate or differentiate based on age, and they play beautiful classical music 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (366 days on the leap years). Do you want to guess where my (admittedly) limited (at this time) fund of charitable donations goes?

I'm not here to run down your event or your organization. I disagree with the logic behind your fee structure, but I sincerely wish you the best of luck. It sounds like you have some tasty food lined up, and I hope your event brings in more than the $83,000 that you made last year. I wish you many more years of success in your organization's mission.

¡Buena suerte!

#10 Step5Productions

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 01:45 PM


No - I don't understand how it is so disconcerting. Generally speaking - an older generation typically has more resources to get involved in this way...


Hola,

It sounds like you are working for a noble cause. The youth, after all, are our future, and I wish you the best of luck. Fund raising is a difficult process in the best of times, and these are far from the best of times. The problem (for me at least) is that your pricing structure is (by definition) discriminatory and your "generally speaking" assumption that anyone older than 35 "has more resources" is fallacious.

35 is an arbitrary cut off, but I understand that if we're going to tier prices based on age there must be a defined tier structure. This would lead to the (ridiculous and hypothetical) situation that Mark Zuckerberg (CEO of Facebook, 27 years old with an estimated wealth > 17 Billion $US) would pay $50 less than Nacho_B for attending your fundraising event. At the same time, I would pay the same entry fee as Bill Gates. A homeless Vietnam war veteran would wind up paying $50 more than a homeless Operation Iraqi Freedom vet. All hypothetical examples, to be sure, but they illustrate the point. Basing a fee structure solely on another person's age ignores the rest of the circumstances of that person's life.

Oh sure, there are discounts for some groups. Senior citizen receive discounts in restaurants and public transportation. There are student discounts for movies and public transit. In India, there's an entry fee for the Taj Mahal for foreigners, and a (substantially discounted) fee for Indians. Someone has to make a decision as to where the discounts apply. What age defines a "senior citizen"? Do graduate students older than 35 qualify for student discounts? Do Pakistanis qualify for the "Indian" price of admission to the Taj Mahal? These are legitimate questions.

My immediate reaction to seeing your fee-structuring was "that's discriminatory" (which it is) and then "that's exploitative" (which is arguable, but still seems that way to me). Either way, here I sit on the other side of 35 years old. I am not an "older established professional", and I have a limited amount of funds to dedicate to charity. 89.9 FM (Portland's 24 hour commercial-free listener-supported classical radio station) is in the midst of their annual fall pledge drive. They simply ask for a donation that's within one's budget, they don't discriminate or differentiate based on age, and they play beautiful classical music 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (366 days on the leap years). Do you want to guess where my (admittedly) limited (at this time) fund of charitable donations goes?

I'm not here to run down your event or your organization. I disagree with the logic behind your fee structure, but I sincerely wish you the best of luck. It sounds like you have some tasty food lined up, and I hope your event brings in more than the $83,000 that you made last year. I wish you many more years of success in your organization's mission.

ˇBuena suerte!



#11 Step5Productions

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 02:02 PM

Actually - many events and organizations use this method of ticket pricing to get new groups of people involved who typically would not be. Just a small example - season tickets for events (sports, music related), museum admission, and other entertainment events all have "Young Adult" prices typically. Its not necessarily fair if I pay less to go see an art exhibit than my parents - or if my season skiing pass is less than yours - but, the bottom line is it provides incentive. Of course you cannot take everyone into account - but you need to draw lines somewhere and this is the method we use to bring the two groups together.

This idea was first established when a charitable foundation matched 100% of any donations from young adults - while only matching 50% from the older generation. We were given this grant with the sole goal of providing an incentive for this younger generation to become involved.

In addition, we understand that not everyone is able to attend the event - which is why we have an option to donate any nominal amount that is reasonable for that particular person on our website.

This method has worked well for us in the past - and has continued to prove successful thus far. We are sorry you disagree with the logic behind our charitable cause - and thank you for your well wishes.