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Shandong Restaurant


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#21 polloelastico

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 10:38 PM

done being boring -- peace out.


Not boring at all. Actually, really, really helpful. Thank you.

I remember the recently-post-college/pre-world-traveler Markovitch that traded in drunken curse words rather than carefully considered, etymological semantics.

I'm old.
“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” — George Carlin

#22 m5570

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 07:27 AM

done being boring -- peace out.


Not boring at all. Actually, really, really helpful. Thank you.



+1

#23 Markovitch

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 08:00 PM


done being boring -- peace out.


Not boring at all. Actually, really, really helpful. Thank you.

I remember the recently-post-college/pre-world-traveler Markovitch that traded in drunken curse words rather than carefully considered, etymological semantics.

I'm old.


hey fuck you, I'm still cool. I'm gonna eat some xiaolongbao.

#24 ASquared

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Posted 22 September 2010 - 11:32 AM

The search for decent Americanized Chinese (or California Chinese or whatever "non-authentic" Chinese title you want to give it) goes on.

Had lunch here last weekend. Weird sour tasting Mongolian Beef with chewy poor quality meat. Hot/Sour soup with virtually no flavor. Do not have any desire to return and try something else.

This place does not deserve the status that the multi-page thread here might impart upon the casual observer (granted most of the messages have nothing to do with the restaurant).

#25 Markovitch

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 01:00 AM

one more thing.

That sign is some nasty Hanzi. The first character is the fourth or fifth you learn 山 it's pretty freaking easy. the second one, according to my assistant, is the traditional character for 东 . they haven't used traiditional characters in Mainland since the 1950s. I'd guess the owners (or the resource they borrowed) are taiwanese or from HK, where they still write using trad characters. No excuse for fucking up the 4th easiest character in either system though.

mark

#26 Henry Liu

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 01:04 PM

one more thing.

That sign is some nasty Hanzi. The first character is the fourth or fifth you learn 山 it's pretty freaking easy. the second one, according to my assistant, is the traditional character for 东 . they haven't used traiditional characters in Mainland since the 1950s. I'd guess the owners (or the resource they borrowed) are taiwanese or from HK, where they still write using trad characters. No excuse for fucking up the 4th easiest character in either system though.

mark




Wow I guess I should have pulled my Logo from a computer instead of having my Mother (who is from Shandong, China) free-hand the script. Yes Mark it's fuckin easy but we were going artistic.(That's when you put your own spin on something) Dumb ass

#27 Henry Liu

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 01:11 PM

Went last night. Nice that they are open later than many places--Asian or otherwise. As already mentioned, nice job on the interior. Don't at all mind that the menu is more limited than many, though might wish for more non-deep fried options (but that's just me.) Had the Ma Po Tofu and the green beans. As already mentioned, the green beans were good--the beans themselves especially--but then it's that time of year. Sometimes I feel like this dish can suffer from "stored bean syndrome" and the beans get a kind of musty flavor. The other elements of this dish were lightly applied and the preserved vegetable that is sometimes in evidence was either not there or very minimally applied. The Ma Po was fresh and a little bit spicy, with sliced mushrooms, which I have not seen before, and the dish did not seem to have the usual pork component. I did not detect the mouth numbing sensation of Szechuan peppercorns that I really like in the version at Chen Zhen (sp?). Different take on the dish I guess. I have not had it in a clay pot before either. In general I agree w/others that the ingredients seem fresh and good.

Service needs a lot of work. It was pretty busy and they are new, and the staff seems really young. There was some staff chattiness (w/each other) when customers were waiting, but generally the two guys seating and cleaning up were pretty busy. The were really haphazard in their attention to setting up tables though, forgetting cups, utensils, napkins, randomly, at many of the tables leaving the one young woman who delivered the food to notice that there was not way to actually eat it.

I also think that their tea service is ridiculous. They use cute ceramic tea pots that hold nothing and the tops fall off of when you pour, and they give you one tea bag for the pot. If you ask for more tea, they just add hot water to the one tea bag. Dudes, it doesn't need to be great tea but for better or worse, in a Chinese restaurant, people expect it, and it goes well with the salty food. I could see having a complimentary inexpensive house tea and charge for upgrade teas, if you want to go with quality there. Or be up front and charge for tea and give people a choice and a reasonable amount.

I think that the rice--just plain old steamed-- was some of the best I have had in a long time. Probably new crop this August.

I want them to do well as they are about 2 blocks from my house and the neighborhood needs a decent restaurant!


Hey Thanks for your comments. I would like to inform you that we no longer have the ceramic teapots and switched to cast iron ones. We are soon going to be able to offer premium tea service along with your complimentary tea. Henry

#28 Henry Liu

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 01:27 PM

I think it's weird that there is so much Sichuan on the menu for a place called Shandong. They don't seem to do the items well or authentically. I think I might give it one more try and only order northern specialties, although I didn't especially like the noodles.


Hey Nick. Thanks for coming out and giving the restaurant a try. the "Shandong bean sauce on noodles" is a dish that most people living in a western society probably would'nt go nuts for. It is however a dish that people from that region would consider "traditional". I offer it on the menu for that reason. Perhaps it would be better if I had it on a secret menu but then I'm hiding my mother and family's heritage. My restaurant vision is to provide clean healthy dishes for the entire family. Not everyone can appreciate a fire hot dish so I limit my dishes so even children can enjoy them. That may seem lame, but if children can not eat my food then parents would avoid my place. Thanks for the time, Henry

#29 Henry Liu

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 01:40 PM

Had lunch here today with my husband. I had spicy seafood noodle soup and he had spicy eggplant. I tasted his and thought it was fine. The sauce was a little too gloppy for me, but the flavor was pretty good. I was pretty disappointed with my dish. The veg. and seafood all tasted like they'd been sauteed in some kind of oil that I couldn't identify, but it was the only discernable flavor and I didn't like it. The broth was one dimensional and not very spicy either. It was hearty in a way, but not complex. I was really hoping this place was going to be good b/c it's close by and I love good Chinese. I might try it again only ordering dishes that others thought were great- I know the green beans are supposed to be good. It is Monday, and it was lunchtime, so maybe it's better at dinner/other days. When I left I noticed the smell of the oil emanating from the kitchen and it make me feel a little ill. Then I saw a box of Queen Bee noodles thrown out by the dumpster- it said they were Chinese yakisoba style. I don't know if they claim that all of their noodles are homemade, but unless something else was stored in that box, it looks like they are using some pre-made noodles. There was only one waiter and he was getting more harried as the place was filling up. He was pleasant enough but seemed overwhelmed. Atmosphere is pleasant but overall I was not impressed.


Hi thanks for your comments. I would like to clarify that we do make our own noodles and the dish you ordered had fresh made noodles in them. We do however buy our chow mein noodles and they come from a local company in Beaverton (Summit noodle). We don't(nobody does) have the capacity to make our own chow mein (yakisoba) noodles. If it was more or less possible then I would. We are proud to be one of the few restaurants in the state that make our own Potstickers, Xiao Loong Bow, Dumplings, Spring Rolls, Noodles, etc. If the Char mao noodle dish was not to your liking, I wish you would have said something, for we take pride in what we do and would like any opportunity to correct any mistakes. Best regards, Henry

#30 philthyanimal

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 01:55 PM


is that noodle dish basically a version of dan dan noodles?




and if this is the 1st good chinese you've had in P-town.... I mean come on, really????



look i made 1 post asking what the name of the noodle dish was. i never stated that i even visited the restaurant, let alone claim that its the first good chinese food i've had in town. condescending remarks such as yours is the reason this forum has been getting less activity.

#31 kjcanfield

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 03:10 PM

I think I was the one to say it was the first good Chinese I have had in Portland, but I totally agree with your statement about snarkiness. Taste is subjective by nature, and I personally like a well executed more westernized Chinese food to eating say chicken feet and fermented eggs - but that's just my taste ;)









is that noodle dish basically a version of dan dan noodles?




and if this is the 1st good chinese you've had in P-town.... I mean come on, really????



look i made 1 post asking what the name of the noodle dish was. i never stated that i even visited the restaurant, let alone claim that its the first good chinese food i've had in town. condescending remarks such as yours is the reason this forum has been getting less activity.



#32 Quo Vadis

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 03:41 PM


one more thing.

That sign is some nasty Hanzi. The first character is the fourth or fifth you learn 山 it's pretty freaking easy. the second one, according to my assistant, is the traditional character for 东 . they haven't used traiditional characters in Mainland since the 1950s. I'd guess the owners (or the resource they borrowed) are taiwanese or from HK, where they still write using trad characters. No excuse for fucking up the 4th easiest character in either system though.

mark




Wow I guess I should have pulled my Logo from a computer instead of having my Mother (who is from Shandong, China) free-hand the script. Yes Mark it's fuckin easy but we were going artistic.(That's when you put your own spin on something) Dumb ass


I don't get out much and don't eat a whole lot of Chinese but for this response alone next time we get out of Tanuki we're coming in.
Well done, Henry Liu. Also- read your response about the dishes that traditionally would be spicy and you tame down for family friendly-can those dishes be made with traditional spice level on request?
Methinks I am like a man, who having struck on many shoals, and having narrowly escap'd shipwreck in passing a small frith, has yet the temerity to put out to sea in the same leaky weather-beaten vessel, and even carries his ambition so far as to think of compassing the globe under these disadvantageous circumstances-Hume

#33 Henry Liu

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 11:16 PM



one more thing.

That sign is some nasty Hanzi. The first character is the fourth or fifth you learn 山 it's pretty freaking easy. the second one, according to my assistant, is the traditional character for 东 . they haven't used traiditional characters in Mainland since the 1950s. I'd guess the owners (or the resource they borrowed) are taiwanese or from HK, where they still write using trad characters. No excuse for fucking up the 4th easiest character in either system though.

mark




Wow I guess I should have pulled my Logo from a computer instead of having my Mother (who is from Shandong, China) free-hand the script. Yes Mark it's fuckin easy but we were going artistic.(That's when you put your own spin on something) Dumb ass


I don't get out much and don't eat a whole lot of Chinese but for this response alone next time we get out of Tanuki we're coming in.
Well done, Henry Liu. Also- read your response about the dishes that traditionally would be spicy and you tame down for family friendly-can those dishes be made with traditional spice level on request?


Heck yes we can dial the spice up. Just ask for extra spice and you will be spicy all day! thanx for your comments. Henry

#34 Markovitch

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 05:35 PM

Yeah I was being a

Dumb ass


good luck with your venture.

#35 tsw51

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 08:20 AM


one more thing.

That sign is some nasty Hanzi. The first character is the fourth or fifth you learn 山 it's pretty freaking easy. the second one, according to my assistant, is the traditional character for 东 . they haven't used traiditional characters in Mainland since the 1950s. I'd guess the owners (or the resource they borrowed) are taiwanese or from HK, where they still write using trad characters. No excuse for fucking up the 4th easiest character in either system though.

mark




Wow I guess I should have pulled my Logo from a computer instead of having my Mother (who is from Shandong, China) free-hand the script. Yes Mark it's fuckin easy but we were going artistic.(That's when you put your own spin on something) Dumb ass


Classy.
Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not. - The Lorax

#36 lapam

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 02:40 PM

When I saw "Shandong" I hoped for a menu offering Northern Chinese food like wheat flour dishes (thick, hearty, chewy noodles; steamed or baked buns; savory dumplings); braised meats; and belly warming stews, to name a few. This is the comfort food that I grew up eating. A review of the menu told me I had set my expectations a bit high. However, I'm used to having my hopes for authentic Chinese food dashed on a regular basis in Portland.

So I gave it a try...twice in a month. Unfortunately, I wasn't too impressed. Between my 2 trips there I ordered 8 different dishes. I would characterize the food here as Chinese food altered to cater to Western palates. The menu is inspired by authentic recipes with fresh ingredients but to me the flavors were muted or bland.

Sigh. I guess I will have to wait until my next trip to the Bay Area or San Gabriel Valley to satisfy my Chinese food cravings.

#37 Henry Liu

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 04:38 PM

When I saw "Shandong" I hoped for a menu offering Northern Chinese food like wheat flour dishes (thick, hearty, chewy noodles; steamed or baked buns; savory dumplings); braised meats; and belly warming stews, to name a few. This is the comfort food that I grew up eating. A review of the menu told me I had set my expectations a bit high. However, I'm used to having my hopes for authentic Chinese food dashed on a regular basis in Portland.

So I gave it a try...twice in a month. Unfortunately, I wasn't too impressed. Between my 2 trips there I ordered 8 different dishes. I would characterize the food here as Chinese food altered to cater to Western palates. The menu is inspired by authentic recipes with fresh ingredients but to me the flavors were muted or bland.

Sigh. I guess I will have to wait until my next trip to the Bay Area or San Gabriel Valley to satisfy my Chinese food cravings.

Hey thanx for giving Shandong a try. You are correct in that my food is "Chinese food altered to cater to Western palates". I'd like to ask what dishes you had when you were in?. I'm not quite sure what dishes would be considered muted or bland for I feel that we are full of flavor but not on heat. I have many family customers and if their children could not eat my food then they would more likely pass my restaurant up. By the way, I am from The Bay. Best regards Henry Liu.

#38 SarahWS

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 07:45 PM

http://www.portlandm...ent?oid=3230160

EVERY NOW AND THEN you happen upon a restaurant that—based on its architecture, signage, or defunct drive-thru—clearly was once a fast food place or a chain diner, but has been converted via chop-suey typefaces or Mexican-flag colors to an independently run ethnic joint. Sometimes, when you take a chance, you happen upon first-generation immigrants serving up authentic, mouth-watering masterpieces on each plate. You'll tell all your friends to ignore the shoddy exterior, that it's way better than whatever the food-writer hacks are christening the best in town.

Sometimes, though, a place that looks from the street like it serves mediocre Chinese food is just going to serve mediocre Chinese food.

With a few very notable exceptions, sadly, the latter was my experience at Shandong.



Somehow ExtraMSG's original post was accidentally deleted when my scroll wheel decided to think for itself...

#39 pwillen1

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 02:17 PM

Reading through this old thread gave me a few laughts.  I too find the dishes here sometimes a bit bland but there are also a number of positives:

  • The XLBs are really nicely seasoned. Lots of interesting flavors going on.
  • The noodle dishes have explosive aromatics from the fresh ingredients. The cucumbers on the black bean noodles and the cilantro in the red curry noodles particularly stand out as enjoyable to smell.
  • The wine list is small but has 10 or so options by the glass appropriate for the food
  • The service is always prompt

I wouldn't drive across town for it, but it's a solid neighborhood place.


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#40 sfl

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 01:29 PM

I think their black bean noodles have gone downhill. Last time I was there a couple of months ago the sauce wasn't even black. My daughter loves jajangmyun and even she said something when the noodles came out saying that it didn't look right. I asked the server and I guess people complained and so he said they Americanized it more.

These days I make it at home. However we got it from Chinese Delicacy the other week and it was good, but their version has seafood in it like squid, shrimp and scallops. I like it but my daughter doesn't like seafood but she loves the noodles and sauce.