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#41 Laksa

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 12:01 PM

Ummm, I think you mean escolar. I can't remember it either.

#42 concreteoatmeal

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 12:07 PM

holy crap! i was thinking escolar and typed escarole....a few times!LOL
mmmm, smoked salad greens...too funny!
"If you were expecting a kick in the groin, and you get a slap in the face.......thats a win where I come from"

#43 ExtraMSG

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 06:11 PM

Man, they go through the chefs at Andina:

For Peruvian native Jose Luis de Cossio, the lure of returning to Andina and putting down roots in Portland, was so enticing that he approached John and Doris Platt about a possible kitchen position. At Andina, de Cossio will be the executive chef overseeing all kitchen staff, as well as bearing the responsibility for creating new dishes and special menus for events held in Tupai and the Pearl Wine Shop. As Andina’s chef de cuisine, de Cossio left Portland in 2006 to re-join the renowned chef and restaurateur, Gastón Acurio, helping him expand the La Mar Cebicheria franchise in Lima and Mexico City, before becoming the executive chef for the new La Mar in San Francisco, California in October 2008.

“We are extremely happy to have Jose Luis and his wife back in our extended family at Andina,” says co-owner Doris Rodriguez de Platt. “We have watched Jose Luis mature as a strong presence in the kitchen, as well as bringing remarkable creativity, delicacy and artistic presentation to our dishes.” Some of his recent specials include Chicharrón Meloso, pork belly braised in pisco, brown sugar, rocoto, and pineapple and served with parsnip gratin and glazed yams and Coho Salmon a la Chorrillano de Tamarindo.

About Jose Luis de Cossio

A native Peruvian, Jose Luis de Cossio, 35, is executive chef at Andina, where he oversees a culinary team emphasizing NovoPeruvian cuisine, as well as the traditional flavors and ingredients found in the Andes and the coastal waters off Peru. De Cossio represents a new wave of young chefs from Peru, spreading their culinary techniques throughout the world. At Andina, de Cossio brings his fresh ideas and enthusiasm for Peruvian cuisine to the Portland dining scene offering exotic, as well as local, organic ingredients. He is passionate about seafood, especially the wild salmon found in the Pacific Northwest.

De Cossio brings more than 10 years of culinary experience both in Peru and abroad to his role at Andina. In addition to heading the kitchen at La Mar in San Francisco, he once ran an independent catering company and began his culinary career at several Peruvian restaurants before traveling abroad to apprentice at Frescos Restaurant in New South Wales, Australia. He is a graduate of the University of Lima and Los Andes Institute for Culinary Studies. An avid surfer, Cossio spends his free time catching waves off the Oregon Coast.


The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#44 abefroman

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 10:12 PM

Man, they go through the chefs at Andina:

For Peruvian native Jose Luis de Cossio, the lure of returning to Andina and putting down roots in Portland, was so enticing that he approached John and Doris Platt about a possible kitchen position. At Andina, de Cossio will be the executive chef overseeing all kitchen staff, as well as bearing the responsibility for creating new dishes and special menus for events held in Tupai and the Pearl Wine Shop. As Andina’s chef de cuisine, de Cossio left Portland in 2006 to re-join the renowned chef and restaurateur, Gastón Acurio, helping him expand the La Mar Cebicheria franchise in Lima and Mexico City, before becoming the executive chef for the new La Mar in San Francisco, California in October 2008.

“We are extremely happy to have Jose Luis and his wife back in our extended family at Andina,” says co-owner Doris Rodriguez de Platt. “We have watched Jose Luis mature as a strong presence in the kitchen, as well as bringing remarkable creativity, delicacy and artistic presentation to our dishes.” Some of his recent specials include Chicharrón Meloso, pork belly braised in pisco, brown sugar, rocoto, and pineapple and served with parsnip gratin and glazed yams and Coho Salmon a la Chorrillano de Tamarindo.

About Jose Luis de Cossio

A native Peruvian, Jose Luis de Cossio, 35, is executive chef at Andina, where he oversees a culinary team emphasizing NovoPeruvian cuisine, as well as the traditional flavors and ingredients found in the Andes and the coastal waters off Peru. De Cossio represents a new wave of young chefs from Peru, spreading their culinary techniques throughout the world. At Andina, de Cossio brings his fresh ideas and enthusiasm for Peruvian cuisine to the Portland dining scene offering exotic, as well as local, organic ingredients. He is passionate about seafood, especially the wild salmon found in the Pacific Northwest.

De Cossio brings more than 10 years of culinary experience both in Peru and abroad to his role at Andina. In addition to heading the kitchen at La Mar in San Francisco, he once ran an independent catering company and began his culinary career at several Peruvian restaurants before traveling abroad to apprentice at Frescos Restaurant in New South Wales, Australia. He is a graduate of the University of Lima and Los Andes Institute for Culinary Studies. An avid surfer, Cossio spends his free time catching waves off the Oregon Coast.



G, and why might that be? Owners that drive you like a goverment mule? Immigration issues? Remember all the problems with Typhoon. Or maybe they like to play musical chefs. ???? Thoughts?

#45 salmonfly65

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 11:31 AM

I hadn't been to Andina in some time and happened to find a parking spot at the entrance last week during lunch hour. We've held several firm dinners (downstairs in the wine room), taken out of town friends for their rack of lamb, and tried lunch maybe once. The menu can be a little overwhelming in terms of their being so many choices. At the suggestion of Gina, I tried the soup special, a three to four mushroom (cannot remember which ones at this point) soup that was really good, especially with a Tikal Malbec. Huge portion even though it is billed as a small soup. I also went with the marinated beef heart kebobs with a peanut dipping sauce. I'd not tried beef heart before, but I am a believer now. Smelled a tad gamey, but in a good way. Almost had some liver qualities too. The four smaller pieces were very tender and literally could probably melt in your mouth if you had the patience to wait. As with the smell, I noted some liver-ish qualities. The dipping sauce was a nice compliment, but the heart standing alone was better. The price, as with the soup, was $8 for the small plate.

The north half of the restaurant was nearly packed when I was there. Mom was going from table to table making sure everyone was enjoying their meal - I think that's a nice gesture. I was also able to talk with Ken for awhile about his trip up north and how expensive (and cost prohibitive) wine is in BC.

I think Andina is overlooked as a good lunch option. They have plenty of space, the staff is very knowledgeable, the service is at a good pace, they have a very decent wine list, and the portions are filling. I tried to upload some photos, but they were too big and I'm not computer savvy enough to figure out if I can somehow shrink them.

#46 Taylah

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 02:01 PM

I just found out that one of the committees I support plans to start having quarterly meetings at Andina - since I've been dying for an excuse to go, I'm pumped!

#47 Twohearted

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 01:11 PM

My wife and I dropped by Andina last night around 7 PM without reservations. Of course, they were packed, but we got a table in their somewhat less formal lounge.

-- tangent -- I suspect formal dining doesn't exist in Portland. I don't think I've noticed where I'd feel under-dressed wearing slacks, a polo and casual shoes.

The dinner menu presents you with a basic dilemma: small plates vs traditional entrees. We decided to be difficult and my wife went with small plates and I went with a traditional entree. The waiter, however, suggested an order to serve the dishes in that worked perfectly.

Me: (1) 6 kumamoto oysters, (2) seco a la nortena
Ryan: (1) soup of the day, (2) empanadas, (3) chorizo

We didn't catch all of the ingredients for the soup of the day, but my wife loved it. It was a stock based (no cream) soup with some kind of vegetable puree (I suspect calabaza), garlic, with a potato and crispy piece of jamon serrano. I'm going to email Andina to see if I can get some details on the dish so I can try and replicate it at home. Kumamotos are some of my favorite oysters and these were nice and fresh. They serve oysters with some different kinds of chutneys (fresh cucumber with vinegar, mushroom cebiche), which were an excellent change of pace from cocktail sauce since they didn't over-power the flavor of the oysters. The mushroom cebiche was the best accompaniment to the kumamotos. The empanadas were good, but my wife thought the ones I make taste better. The lamb shank entree (seco a la nortena) was fork tender and the black beer sauce, rice, white beans and salsa criolla made for a dish that felt authentic and tasted wonderful. My only criticism of the lamb was that I thought it was a touch too salty and the entree was pretty big.

One thing that pissed me off though was when the service made a classic blunder. We had cocktails before ordering food and then I ordered a glass of txakoli to drink with my oysters. My oysters came, but my glass of txakoli didn't appear for quite a while. The waiter came by and said the bar was backed up. How the hell does a bar get backed up to the point where they can't pour a glass of wine? When my glass of txakoli finally arrived, I started eating my oysters only to have the lamb shank and the rest of my wife's dishes arrive a couple minutes after. In other words, the wait staff didn't realize their fuck up, didn't adjust and just piled dishes on the table. To me, this is a classic service mistake that is the difference between restaurants with average service and restaurants with great service.

The service blunder won't be enough to keep us away since we really like the flavors and dishes available at Andina. In the future I'll probably just stick to small plates though.

#48 gturillo

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 02:42 PM

1st experience @ Andina on Saturday afternoon. Turns out I've walked by it many times and just never noticed it. We had reservations for noon and were promptly seated in the main dining room by a window. When we left at 1:30pm every table in the main dining room was occupied. The atmosphere was nice, it was cozy, warm feeling, and the acoustics were good - as in we could carry on a conversation w/out having to shout. Loved the splashes of color here & there. Service was excellent. Things came out at a leisurely pace, we weren't rushed. We had a hard time deciding what to order not because we wanted one of everything but because we had a hard time finding something we did want. This menu just didn't do it for us. It happens. Funny enough, we were both drawn to the same entree so we decided to order a bottle of wine, and split a small plate, an entree, a desert & pot of coffee. The items ordered were presented well and cooked well. Nothing about it was particularly memorable or outstanding. We left satisfied: not stuffed, not hungry. We've gone to some great restaurants here in town & have been back to a few of them... there are several that we would like to get back to and there are a lot of restaurants that we still want to try for the 1st time. This restaurant doesn't make it onto the "OMG that sucked" list but, for no particular reason, it sure doesn't make it onto our "gotta go back there" list.

#49 TastyTidbits1

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 09:40 PM

It felt like too much work.

Went to Andina tonight hoping to enjoy a nice holiday meal. I had called ahead and was told reservations are not accepted upstairs but with a modest wait, they could definitely accommodate us. We arrived at 5:30 and were greeted by a hostess at the bar's entrance.

Hostess: Good evening. How many of you tonight?
Me: Two. We would like to start with some cocktails in the bar and then dinner later.
Hostess: I'm sorry. There are no tables available in the bar. Would you like to wait for the bar or I can seat you downstairs now.
(There are four four-tops set and available in the bar only feet from us)
Me: We would prefer to sit upstairs. Is it not possible to have one of the open tables here?
Hostess: I'm sorry - these tables are for some larger parties on the way.
Me: Did they call ahead? I thought you don't take reservations.
Hostess: We don't. You can wait or I can seat you downstairs now.
Me: Is there room at the bar? Oh, there are two seats over there (in a space meant for one bar stool).
(She goes to seat us and we pass an open two-top in the corner)
Me: There is a two-top. (Happy to have found a legal table.) Can we sit there?
Hostess: No - it's reserved.
Me: I thought you didn't take reservations.
Hostess: We don't (rolling her eyes) but this is a concierge reservation. You can sit there but we will need it back by 7pm.

We sat at the bar - not really sure what to do next. Leave? Have a drink and leave? I'm dumbfounded as to how the seating in this restaurant works. It would seem upon communicating our plans for the evening, the hostess should have put us on the list for a table in the dinning room (or at least offered), and in the interim provided us with one of the tables in the bar. But we were not offered that courtesy. She could have turned it around by mentioning the two-top had a special reservation for later, but offer it to us while we wait for our table. Then moved us to the dinning room without issue.

It's unfortunate that our experience was so shitty because the cocktails, oysters, and small plate were really quite nice. Our server was excellent.

Oh, and the four empty tables in the bar? Three of them remained empty until just before we left. Over an hour with nobody sitting there. I guess Mike Jagger and friends didn't show up.

#50 ExtraMSG

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 10:03 PM

What? It's obvious how the seating works: they won't take a reservation in the bar unless it's a VIP or someone they want to give special consideration for, not you lousy regular people. ;)

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#51 TastyTidbits1

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 10:25 PM

Silly us. We now know to be grateful for what they deem we deserve.

We decided to postpone our splurge dinner until tomorrow. Instead, we went to Lardo - where everyone is always nice, the food is great, and nobody plays games with the seating.

#52 ExtraMSG

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 11:01 PM

Andina takes reservations in their normal dining room, though, right? Just not the bar upstairs?

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#53 TastyTidbits1

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 11:18 PM

Andina takes reservations in their normal dining room, though, right? Just not the bar upstairs?

My takeaway when I called was no reservations upstairs for the restaurant or bar. Reservations downstairs only. I may have been mistaken.

Updated: I just called - they take reservations for the dining room only. They seem to be booked well in advance, but as I was told, if you walk in they can usually accommodate you with a modest wait.

#54 polloelastico

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 11:56 PM

That sucks...I would assume that nothing ever gets reserved in the bar, thus I don't understand the cock block - maybe once-a-year Christmas bookings?
“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” — George Carlin

#55 TastyTidbits1

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 11:48 AM

That sucks...I would assume that nothing ever gets reserved in the bar, thus I don't understand the cock block - maybe once-a-year Christmas bookings?

It's possible - today I read a post from Kernel (December 2007) who also had a frustrating experience:

"My SO and I had reservations at 8:00. We arrived at about 8:05 and were told our table wasn't quite ready. The hostess suggested we wait in the downstairs "wine bar," but I was interested in grabbing a cocktail in the main bar. The hostess said it was "full." I didn't quite understand. So I walked over to the bar and the bar hostess stopped me, saying it was full. I told her I simply wanted to walk up to the bar and grab a drink while waited. She said that was impossible, as the entire bar was taken up by diners. I can't describe how much this aggravated me. You can't get a drink in the bar? That's completely asinine."

If I had read that review beforehand, I would have been better prepared for battle; instead, we were not ready for their arrogant and complicated rules of engagement.

#56 jennifer

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 12:08 PM

I had an experience there several years ago. I had a dinner reservation for 3 at 6:30pm. My 70-year-old Mom was with us and was using a cane at the time, but could walk okay. We got there at 6:20pm and they told us it'd be a few minutes. 15 minutes went by and 2 other parties were seated. 30 minutes went by and more parties were seated. I kept checking in, and they continued to tell us our table wasn't ready yet. No apology for the wait, no offer of a drink, no "Would you like to take a seat at the bar while you wait," nothing. Just endless numbers of parties going in, and we're standing there like idiots for a full hour until they finally seated us. Not one apology.

Normally I'd leave. But there weren't many other options in the 7pm hour on a Friday night for a walk-in party of 3 and no wait. So we waited at Andina. And waited. And waited. Hindsight, we should've left and grabbed take-out someplace and went home.

I guess we weren't cool or VIP enough. :rolleyes:

#57 singingpig

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 12:47 PM

Seems like they would at least bring you some drinks from the bar

#58 Quo Vadis

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 01:18 PM

To be fair to Andina, even though from the one sided tale it does sound as though the could have handled it in a more friendly manner, restaurant guests tend to love it when exceptions are made for them but not when made for others. Every restaurant has rules and has circumstances where exceptions might sometimes be made. Taking it personally is a bit much since you never know the full story and honestly the host has neither the time or the obligation to tell you the full behind the scenes story of why that one exception was made.

You can choose to feel as though you've been personally snubbed.
Or you can choose to accept that there are places where you are the person that gets exceptions, the place you are in is not one of those places and have a good time anyway.

Everyone is a VIP somewhere, no one is a VIP everywhere.
Methinks I am like a man, who having struck on many shoals, and having narrowly escap'd shipwreck in passing a small frith, has yet the temerity to put out to sea in the same leaky weather-beaten vessel, and even carries his ambition so far as to think of compassing the globe under these disadvantageous circumstances-Hume

#59 ExtraMSG

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 01:26 PM

Or you can choose to accept that there are places where you are the person that gets exceptions, the place you are in is not one of those places and have a good time anyway.


And some places just do stupid shit that alienates a large segment of customers. Sometimes that's fine for their bottom line because they're busy enough -- due to location, quality, trendiness, or whatever. Rarely good in the long run, though. There does, at least, seem to be a pattern at Andina over the years.

The greatest service chemistry has rendered to alimentary science, is the discovery of osmazome, or rather the determination of what it was. ~Brillat-Savarin

Nick Zukin, Mi Mero Mole

Co-Author, Artisan Jewish Deli at Home

Formerly, Kenny & Zuke's


#60 Quo Vadis

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 01:48 PM

And some places just do stupid shit that alienates a large segment of customers. Sometimes that's fine for their bottom line because they're busy enough -- due to location, quality, trendiness, or whatever. Rarely good in the long run, though. There does, at least, seem to be a pattern at Andina over the years.


I don't know that such a large segment of customers think that everything is their business.
My point remains- people have no problems when exceptions are made for them- they ask for exceptions to be made for them all the time. They only have problems when exceptions are made for others. You can't make an exception for everybody- then it isn't an exception anymore it is SOP.

I'm not trying to insult the OP with this-I was just trying to illustrate how it could be looked at if one made the choice to not take it personally. There's plenty of people on this board who've complained about seeing a table get special treatment somewhere who have never thought twice about asking me to make exceptions for them (not this particular thread- past conversations I mean).

The OP was offered a place at the bar (check their post) and also was told they could have a seat downstairs immediately. That wasn't good enough. They only wanted the seats that had been set aside. For all we know the larger group that had the exception made could have been a dinner won in a charity auction (yes- this is a frequent occurance) could have been the owner's family flying in for a visit or people they do business with coming in for a tasting relevent to operations- or any number of reasonable things. We don't know, and it really isn't any of our business so long as we are not treated unreasonably.

I remember a couple years ago I came by to K&Z to say hi and you gave me some free bagels and stuff to take with me. Should everyone in the place that you didn't give free bagels to have written in with their outrage for being treated differently? Or was it just a friendly gesture that you had a personal reason to make and which I accepted with gratitude?
Methinks I am like a man, who having struck on many shoals, and having narrowly escap'd shipwreck in passing a small frith, has yet the temerity to put out to sea in the same leaky weather-beaten vessel, and even carries his ambition so far as to think of compassing the globe under these disadvantageous circumstances-Hume